HP steel tanks.

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ben_wilson3301

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I have a yoke setup now. If I buy a HP steel tank is there some reason why I should switch to DIN?

Also, what size steel is similar in size to a 80AL? Outer dimension, obviously not volume.

Who makes the best steel?
 

D_B

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With the 3442psi HP tanks you do not need a DIN
Size? a close one (that I like and have) is the Worthington / XS Scuba HP100 , it's smaller by a bit, and holds more air, and because it doesn't go positively buoyant when low on air, you can lose about 6 lbs of lead weight

Tank Chart ... Scuba Cylinder Specifications from Tech Diving Limited - 928-855-9400
 

cmburch

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I have an old yoke that I converted to DIN. The part cost me about $45. Maybe the new yokes can handle the stress. I normally was the first to surface and my wife would get upset sometimes cutting her dive short because I suck air. The HP100 is a great tank. Same diameter as Al80. A little shorter. I was able to drop about 5lbs off my belt (A BIG PLUS) since difference in buoyancy empty. Now I have more air left at the end of the dive than those with Al80's. I also have the newer HP130's that has an insert for use with either DIN or the correct yoke made for HP tanks.

XS Scuba Worthington Steel Cylinder Specifications

I think some newer yokes can purchase a screw on DIN adapter for about $35. It would stick out farther though I think. The DIN seems easier to use for me. Less problems with tank O-ring and feels more secure.
 

RTee

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If your reg is rated to 3500 psi, then you could opt for a steel tank with a 232 valve as descrided here which can be used with a yoke assembly (with insert) or DIN (Insert removed). A HP 100 is 2 in shorter than an Al 80 while a HP120 will be 2 in longer.
 

j2s

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If you convert your reg. to a 300bar din and get a din-to-yoke adapter, then you'll be prepared for any setup....Keep in mind a 232bar din will not fit a 300bar valve, but a 300bar din will fit either 232 or 300.....If you plan on diving for awhile sooner or later you'll need/want a 300bar din especially w/the higher capacity steel tanks.......
 

a22shady

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As stated above I Personally like the XS Scuba/Worthington HP100's I think they are the have the best characteristics between weight/air IMO. Also you don't have to switch your reg's around I dove for about 6 months with mine in yoke with no issue's. I have heard the High pressure can where out or cause issue's after long use again don't know if this is true just what i have heard. I do know that there are benefits to the Din valvs, besides that they can handle higer pressures, they also give you a stronger connection. Also I belive Yoke valves are only rated to 3400~ so if you happen to get strong fills at 35-3600 it could cause adde'd stress to the Yoke but again just things I have heard and what I have read from Manufactures/
 

MichelG

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The reason I switched to DIN is because I dive a lot of wrecks and it's less likely that my DIN reg will move from the valve if I bump it on the wreck. So like said above, more secure connection. And the size I use that is like AL80 is HP 120, I use HP 100 sometimes but i'm a tall guy and it fits well for me.
 

ben_wilson3301

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Just more gas for training dives. I have a pretty low SAC and can get away with a tank a day during teaching and training dives with plenty to spare. If I had a little larger tank I think I could end up bringing one tank for the whole weekend.
 

Colliam7

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If I buy a HP steel tank is there some reason why I should switch to DIN?
Not necessarily. You can put valves on steel tanks that afford you the ability to use a DIN regulator, or a yoke regulator with the use of a valve insert. And, although a general argument could possibly be made for the use of DIN over yoke in general, most training operations, and most rental outfits, in the Western Hemisphere use AL80s which are generally going have yoke valves.
Also, what size steel is similar in size to a 80AL? Outer dimension, obviously not volume.
I am not aware of a HP steel tank that is identicial in external dimensions (height and diameter) to an AL80. The HP 100 which several posters have mentioned comes very close - same diameter, but is ~2 inches shorter than an AL80. If what you want is a large single tank, you could also consider a HP130 - same length, but an 8 inch diameter instead of a 7.25. We have several DMs who use 130s for classes, for the very reason you indicate. They don't have to change tanks very often, and some go through 4 OW dives on one tank. Great tank for the right diver. Of course, the other 'dimension' you might take into consideration is the tank weight when full. The full AL80 might weigh somewhere abround 38 lbs, the full HP 100 might come in a bit over 40 lbs, while the full 130 will probably weigh something over 54 lbs. Actual weights may vary according to manufacturer.

If you are interested in comparative dimensions, the XS Scuba website offers some charts (only one manufacturer, though) as a guide: XS Scuba Worthington Steel Cylinder Specifications
Who makes the best steel?
Who makes the best automobile? There are different opinions, based on trim characteristics, and whether the tank is painted or galvanized, etc., or primarily based on what the person owns. With the demise of Pressed Steel, which was a very popular line of galvanized HP steel scuba tanks, Worthingtons seem to be the most commonly seen in the US. That doesn't make them the 'best', just among the more popular.
 
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