Fort Wetherill Saturday

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wreckedinri

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Well, I got to break the "dry spell" and hit the water Saturday at Fort Wetherill. I was joined by RIO and a couple of friends from the Old Colony Amphibians as I got to make my 1st dive after being released from the Docs care due to a motorcycle "incident" in July of 08. Vis was only about 6 feet due to the overcast conditions and turbidity caused by wave action, with water temps around 39 degrees. The trickiest part of the dive was the walk to and from the water. Ice is a bit slick with rubber soled dry-suit boots - especially when they're wet!

I'd like to take this opportunity to thank everyone for all the get well wishes, e-mails and cards. It's just great to be among "the wet" again.

Dennis
 

RIOceanographer

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It was great to see you finally get back in the water after your dry spell! Welcome back!

From now on please try not to take your screen name so literally!
 
OP
wreckedinri

wreckedinri

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It was great to see you finally get back in the water after your dry spell! Welcome back!

From now on please try not to take your screen name so literally!

Dude, I never even thought of that, but Thanks!
 

vaq

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I went yesterday with a bunch of the divemasters and instructors from Northeast Scuba. It was my first time at the site (usually dive Cape Ann shore or boat) -- what a great dive and site (less the snow and ice...). Vis yesterday was a little better, maybe 15ft. I imagine it gets a fair amount of traffic in the warmer months.
 

RIOceanographer

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Vis yesterday was a little better, maybe 15ft. I imagine it gets a fair amount of traffic in the warmer months.

Glad the conditions were a bit better for you.

And yes, it's usually very busy in the summer. I'd hazard a guess that it is probably the most heavily trafficked shore dive in all of New England. That parking lot is usually almost full of divers on any nice weekend in the summer.
 

ScubaSarus

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RI almost has the deepest shore dives on the East coast of America. The Somes Sound is the only one I know that is deeper. Castle hill goes to 180 ft. Ft Wetheril off the Island to 103 ft. Cat Rocks in Gloucester, MA 80 ft. The unexplored Northern Maine coast has to have some steep drop-offs someplace. This may have to do with glacial carving. Go south and the coasts seem more sandy and mildly sloped.

Ide like to learn more to debate the statement I just made.
 

RIOceanographer

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This may have to do with glacial carving. Go south and the coasts seem more sandy and mildly sloped.

It is related to the glaciers but it is not just glacial carving. Other aspects are erosion caused by glacial melt water and isostatic rebound where the crust springs upward after the weight of the glacier and eroded sediment are removed. This is the same combination of processes that leads to the formation of Fjords in places like Norway.

Southern New England was also at about the southern limit of the last glaciation so there is another glacial feature you will see here called a terminal moraine. Examples are Long Island, Block Island, Martha's Vineyard, Nantucket and Cape Cod. These are basically just big mounds of material pushed up in front of the advancing glacier during the last ice age that were left behind when the glacier retreated. That's why you don't see anything quite like Long Island or Cape Cod anywhere else on the East Coast.
 

Sean222

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Dennis I am glad to see you back. I unfortunately am dry for the next month at least. I was walking my dog at Wetherill on Wednesday and slipped on the Ice.
I took a trip in the Rescue truck and found out that I have a Fractured Vertabrae(T-4).




Well, I got to break the "dry spell" and hit the water
Saturday at Fort Wetherill. I was joined by RIO and a couple of friends from the Old Colony Amphibians as I got to make my 1st dive after being released from the Docs care due to a motorcycle "incident" in July of 08. Vis was only about 6 feet due to the overcast conditions and turbidity caused by wave action, with water temps around 39 degrees. The trickiest part of the dive was the walk to and from the water. Ice is a bit slick with rubber soled dry-suit boots - especially when they're wet!

I'd like to take this opportunity to thank everyone for all the get well wishes, e-mails and cards. It's just great to be among "the wet" again.

Dennis
 

Medic0506

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It is related to the glaciers but it is not just glacial carving. Other aspects are erosion caused by glacial melt water and isostatic rebound where the crust springs upward after the weight of the glacier and eroded sediment are removed. This is the same combination of processes that leads to the formation of Fjords in places like Norway.

Southern New England was also at about the southern limit of the last glaciation so there is another glacial feature you will see here called a terminal moraine. Examples are Long Island, Block Island, Martha's Vineyard, Nantucket and Cape Cod. These are basically just big mounds of material pushed up in front of the advancing glacier during the last ice age that were left behind when the glacier retreated. That's why you don't see anything quite like Long Island or Cape Cod anywhere else on the East Coast.

Thanks for the insight. I have never taken a geology class so I'm always amazed at how that all works. Got some extra space next semester, maybe I will.
 

RIOceanographer

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Dennis I am glad to see you back. I unfortunately am dry for the next month at least. I was walking my dog at Wetherill on Wednesday and slipped on the Ice.
I took a trip in the Rescue truck and found out that I have a Fractured Vertabrae(T-4).

Yikes John! Hope you get well quickly.

At least you timed your injury better than Dennis.... if you're going to get laid up, do it when the weather stinks.
 
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