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Fire on dive boat Conception in CA

Discussion in 'Accidents and Incidents' started by divezonescuba, Sep 2, 2019.

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  1. Bob DBF

    Bob DBF Solo Diver

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: NorCal
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    No it doesn't, and considering the how close they anchored to land, I wouldn't expect them to do that on the weather side of the island unless the conditions, and mist (fog) was very mild.

    The fact that the galley is behind the wheelhouse, under the upper deck, and enclosed would make it hard to impossible to see anything going on there from the wheelhouse.

    From what I've observed on the SoCal dive boats, mainly Truth Aquatics and the Peace dive boat, the crews were quite professional, and that's from a sub sailor that spent time on surface craft as well. How well I sleep on a boat depends on what I see from the crew, and I slept well on those boats.

    What a lot of people don't get is that every crewman, and it should be every man aboard, is a watchman. The crewman that checked the galley, and probably the rest of the boat, even if he wasn't the watch, in which case most likely checked in with the watch with the pertinent information on what he saw before hitting the rack. From the timeline it was fully engulfed in less than an hour from when the crewman left the galley, an hour is the usual time frame for rounds for a lot of maritime watches.

    Out of habit, on-board, when I get up at night for a head call, I do a walk around the boat looking for anything unusual, before I can go back to sleep. That's when I have seen them on their rounds or exchanged waves from the fore deck to the wheelhouse. I made friends with a number of crew on the dive boats because I did take a professional attitude towards the boat as they did. May be this tragedy could get divers to become better seamen as well, not that it would have helped in this case, but avoiding an accident at sea is everyone's job. Or as an old bo's'n told me out in the middle of the Atlantic "you can't be too careful when the closest land is straight down".



    Bob
     
    bowlofpetunias, eleniel, Dish and 8 others like this.
  2. cerich

    cerich ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: Georgia
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    absolutely and I was talking generalities, not in any manner speculating on how professional the crew in Conception were.
     
  3. KevinNM

    KevinNM DIR Practitioner

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    Which also means this is what the ABS and the USCG expect to see and are used to approving. Once you exit that practical safeharbor it can be very expensive to do the engineering studies and tests to show that your idea is just as good.
     
    JackD342 likes this.
  4. Luis H

    Luis H Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Maine
    2,870
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    I sure hope so. Specially since published minimum standards have been around for a while.
     
  5. Rollin Bonz

    Rollin Bonz Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Georgia, the state, not the country ;-)
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    Exactly...
    and
    "It's never been a problem before" - and it won't be a problem... until it is
     
    Luis H and Boiler_81 like this.
  6. bigDave

    bigDave Nassau Grouper

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    So my suggestion is that the boats should have a dedicated main deck watch who walks the main deck at night and is in the salon when not walking around. We now know (at a sadly high price) that the salon must be clear for any evacuation from the sleeping quarters. This is in addition to any night/anchor watch since that is primarily done from the bridge deck. Maybe the main deck watch will periodically check the bunk area.

    Even if the main deck watch dozes off, at least he/she is in the salon and likely to be awakened by anything that happens in that area.

    If that means adding another crewmember and raising the per day price accordingly, I think it's a good investment in safety.
     
    Gdog likes this.
  7. Luis H

    Luis H Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Maine
    2,870
    1,022
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    My statement was just in general terms for other types of deficiencies. The vessels I normally work on have to comply with extensive ship specification and Mil standards.

    Even with all the detail specifications and standards, there is always some room for interpretations and requires engineering judgement. I am not going to be out of work anytime soon.

    I have worked on a few vessels under ABS rules. I was not that impressed, but they are better than...
     
    rjack321 likes this.
  8. tursiops

    tursiops Marine Scientist and Master Instructor ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: U.S. East Coast
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    People give that same answer about any change...nothing special about shipbuilding.
     
  9. EricTheDood

    EricTheDood DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: California
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    My opinion is that bunk rooms are ill suited for recreational LOBs where everyone's on the same sleeping schedule, so for me it's a nonstarter.

    Obviously fire is the number one thing on everyone's mind right now, but flooding/capsizing should be of equal concern. Bunk rooms remind me of lobster traps. No thanks.
     
  10. pauldw

    pauldw Solo Diver

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    Or, as I put it after 2+ decades in court, It's not a justice system, it's just a system (not originally my aphoroism). It's never a surprise that people hate lawyers and insurance companies. So much here fails the smell test, that it's astounding people keep saying "well, that's how it's done." No, that's how some people do things. I'm trying hard to find a single good thing in this entire mess, and so far I guess all there is would be the Grape Escape couple stepping up. Edit: Well, and the divers who have to recover the bodies.
     
    CZS, Hiszpan, cerich and 1 other person like this.
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