Dunderberg Death

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BoneCrusher

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This is now posted over in the accidents section. But to keep everyone up on the info, the preliminary autopsy reports were released..

Huron Daily Tribune > News > Local News

Autopsy reveals nothing abnormal after diver’s death
Published: Tuesday, May 25, 2010 8:24 AM EDT
By STACY LANGLEY
Tribune Staff Writer

HURON COUNTY — The preliminary autopsy results on the 46-year-old Munger man who was pronounced dead at Harbor Beach Hospital on Sunday after scuba diving a shipwreck with friends revealed nothing abnormal.

Huron County Sheriff Kelly J. Hanson said the investigation will now focus on the dive equipment used by Daniel M. Kleinert, who was scuba diving Sunday morning about 6 1/2 miles northeast of Harbor Beach when he became unresponsive.

“(Kleinert’s) equipment, will be taken to a dive shop to have the dive tank checked and tested and have all the equipment looked at,” Hanson said Monday afternoon. “So far all we have is the preliminary autopsy results that show nothing abnormal. The toxicology results are going to take a bit longer— that might show something. We don’t know yet.”

*
Kleinert was diving with a partner about 140 feet in the water on the shipwrecked schooner called the Dunderburgh, which sank in 1868.

Police report two other divers with Kleinert were preparing to go under, when Kleinert’s partner sensed Kleinert was having trouble and Kleinert had become unresponsive in the water.

Preliminary investigation by police has revealed the dive partner, whose name has not been released, inflated Kleinert’s buoyancy control vest, which raised him to the surface.

Kleinert was then found by the other two friends at about 11:25 a.m. on Sunday floating on the surface of the water. The Harbor Beach Coast Guard was radioed for help by the friends.

Hanson said the two friends attempted to revive Kleinert at the scene while they waited for the Coast Guard to arrived. Kleinert was transported by the coast guard to Harbor Beach, where the Eastern Huron Ambulance Service was waiting. Kleinert was pronounced dead at the Harbor Beach Hospital a short time later.

The autopsy was conducted Monday at Huron Medial Center in Bad Axe.

Hanson said the matter remains under investigation.
 

Notso_Ken

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So, am I reading this right? Are they saying the dive buddy inflated the guys BC at 140 feet and let him shoot to the surface by his lonesome? Was I sleeping when this was taught in Rescue?


Ken


This is now posted over in the accidents section. But to keep everyone up on the info, the preliminary autopsy reports were released..

Huron Daily Tribune > News > Local News

Autopsy reveals nothing abnormal after diver’s death
Published: Tuesday, May 25, 2010 8:24 AM EDT
By STACY LANGLEY
Tribune Staff Writer

HURON COUNTY — The preliminary autopsy results on the 46-year-old Munger man who was pronounced dead at Harbor Beach Hospital on Sunday after scuba diving a shipwreck with friends revealed nothing abnormal.

Huron County Sheriff Kelly J. Hanson said the investigation will now focus on the dive equipment used by Daniel M. Kleinert, who was scuba diving Sunday morning about 6 1/2 miles northeast of Harbor Beach when he became unresponsive.

“(Kleinert’s) equipment, will be taken to a dive shop to have the dive tank checked and tested and have all the equipment looked at,” Hanson said Monday afternoon. “So far all we have is the preliminary autopsy results that show nothing abnormal. The toxicology results are going to take a bit longer— that might show something. We don’t know yet.”

*
Kleinert was diving with a partner about 140 feet in the water on the shipwrecked schooner called the Dunderburgh, which sank in 1868.

Police report two other divers with Kleinert were preparing to go under, when Kleinert’s partner sensed Kleinert was having trouble and Kleinert had become unresponsive in the water.

Preliminary investigation by police has revealed the dive partner, whose name has not been released, inflated Kleinert’s buoyancy control vest, which raised him to the surface.

Kleinert was then found by the other two friends at about 11:25 a.m. on Sunday floating on the surface of the water. The Harbor Beach Coast Guard was radioed for help by the friends.

Hanson said the two friends attempted to revive Kleinert at the scene while they waited for the Coast Guard to arrived. Kleinert was transported by the coast guard to Harbor Beach, where the Eastern Huron Ambulance Service was waiting. Kleinert was pronounced dead at the Harbor Beach Hospital a short time later.

The autopsy was conducted Monday at Huron Medial Center in Bad Axe.

Hanson said the matter remains under investigation.
 

DOkie

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I understand from other reports that he was unresponsive and not breathing. In this situation, what is the lesser of two evils? If they were in deco, does the other diver miss his stops?
 

BoneCrusher

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So, this accident aside... Im curious what you would do as a diver in a similar situation. I feel there are a few different options for a diver to take.

Conditions:
1.) You are at 150 feet deep.
2.) You have some deco obligation.
3.) You come across an unconscious, non-breathing diver.
4.) You are limited to the gear that you would normally have on a dive of this type.

What would you do? How would YOU handle the situation?
 

cerich

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if i have a deco obligation and the diver is not breathing and underwater he is dead already. I will shoot him like a lift bag and hopefully the MOST important members of my technical diving team, namely surface support, will be able to bring the DEAD diver back to life.

If I had only a couple mins of deco I would bring the diver up, but a real deco oblig? Nope, I am not going to reduce the chance of bringing back the other diver by adding another casualty.
 

Randy43068

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Replies from tech instructors only, please!

Why instructors only?

I may have done just what was described, assuming I had deco obligations.

he's unresponsive. Is he breathing? I'm assuming not.

I'd put some air in his BC and send him up, too... probably. Or, I may drag him up with me and hang out at Deco. Then maybe send him on his way from my first deco stop.

Either way, it's not good for the poor guy who's not responding and from the facts presented I'd "probably" do the same thing.
 

CDNScubaMoose

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So, this accident aside... Im curious what you would do as a diver in a similar situation. I feel there are a few different options for a diver to take.

Conditions:
1.) You are at 150 feet deep.
2.) You have some deco obligation.
3.) You come across an unconscious, non-breathing diver.
4.) You are limited to the gear that you would normally have on a dive of this type.

What would you do? How would YOU handle the situation?

I am curious to your 4th point. What gear are you talking about being limited on this type of dive? If I am going to plan a dive to 150' that includes incurring some deco then I doubt I am going to also plan on not having all the gear that I would normally have. However, I may be misreading your statement as to what you are referring to.

What would I do?- 150' probably isn't going to have a large deco obligation so I would like say that I am going to take the victim to the surface or to whatever point I can directly hand them off to my surface support. This may include skipping some stops so depending on if the emergency logistics dictated in my dive plan concerning if the boat would be leaving ASAP or if help was going to be coming towards us I would either return to depth to complete the deco obligations or get on board, start treating myself for an expected DCS hit and advise the appropriate medical resources of the situation.
 
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