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Dive Rite Slide Lock reel ?

Discussion in 'Lift Bags, SMBs and Reels' started by cmrangel, Feb 26, 2017.

  1. stuartv

    stuartv Seeking the Light

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Manassas, VA
    8,053
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    I am so glad you said this! I thought it was just me!
     
  2. Anthony A.

    Anthony A. Barracuda

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    I played with this reel at my lds and it was really nice size, good grip and easy to reel. Anyone use it for smb deployment? How hard/smooth is it to reel in when you are applying tension on theine to keep the smb upright?
     
  3. JohnnyC

    JohnnyC Divemaster

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: United States
    3,213
    3,384
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    I've got one. I generally like it. I don't like the boltsnap that it comes with so I took it out and use it with a normal double ender. Unlike some people I like locking my reel any time I have to do any sort of manipulation with it. With a screw-lock reel you end up faffing about with it so you don't usually lock it off until you tie in somewhere. I've never dropped a reel, but I've seen other people drop theirs. It's just less of an issue if it's locked off. The slide lock allows you to lock and unlock quickly and easily, potentially adding another preventative layer to "inadvertent line deployment." I also find it easier to achieve proper line tension for tie-offs.

    I like it for rebreather diving because I still have a hand free to do things like correct buoyancy, clip a chicken, etc. while dealing with a reel while tying in. It's not a huge deal, I've never had an issue using a regular sidewinder reel, but it's easier for sure.

    The only thing I don't like that I can't easily correct is the spool itself. I'm a fan of delrin, the plastic that Dive Rite uses for the spool portion can brittle with age and form cracks. I've never had this problem with any of my delrin reels/spools. One of the reasons I quit using other Dive Rite reels is because of their propensity to brittle and crack. We'll see if this ends up the same.

    It's also a little sloppy with lock-up. With a normal screw-lock reel, it's essentially infinitely adjustable. The spool locks exactly where you want it. Because the slide-lock engages in the slots on the spool, there's play. Only a couple degrees, and it's a minor annoyance, but I'd prefer finer adjustment. I'm picking up a lathe pretty soon and may turn a delrin spool with finer "locking slots" in it to see how I like it.
     
    stuartv likes this.
  4. Anthony A.

    Anthony A. Barracuda

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    Thanks for that review. I agree about the plastic. If you decide to spin a few more spools, im sure I would get one from you. I also think the slide lock knob is too short. The diameter is fine but if it were 1/2" or more longer, it really would be much easier to move when wearing thick glives. If you decide to spin a longer knob, i'd get that from you too :)
     
  5. cruisekingkris

    cruisekingkris Regular of the Pub

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: New Jersey
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    +1 for it being a PIA to reel back in. Laying line is smooth. I'm going to try to install a longer knob if I can find the time.
     
  6. Anthony A.

    Anthony A. Barracuda

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    Have you used with with a smb? Was it hard to reel in when applying the downward pressure from tge smb to keep it upright?
     
  7. cruisekingkris

    cruisekingkris Regular of the Pub

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: New Jersey
    245
    30
    28
    I have only laid line on wrecks with it. Sorry
     
  8. JohnnyC

    JohnnyC Divemaster

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: United States
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    3,384
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    I would NEVER use a reel that has the propensity to lock easily with an SMB, it's a recipe for yanking it out of your hand and losing it to the wind. It's one of the reasons I loathe those thumb triggered click lock cheap plastic reels. I've seen enough people lose their SMB's because their reel locked and yanked it out of their hands that I've lost count. It's more than fingers and toes. Sure, you probably won't lose it for good, the boat will just pick it up, but now you're stuck without your primary SMB, hopefully you have a backup.

    In this case, if you have to shoot an SMB deep enough that you'll need a reel rather than a finger spool, use a regular screw-lock sidewinder that won't seize the spool portion inadvertently.
     
  9. Anthony A.

    Anthony A. Barracuda

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    Good advice. I only shoot my smb at 30' or at the safety stop so im not concerned about losing it. I havent had issues yet but im always looking for a new and shiny reel :)
     
  10. JohnnyC

    JohnnyC Divemaster

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: United States
    3,213
    3,384
    113
    It's not so much a question of losing it from a lost gear standpoint, if there's air in the smb it will just drift along and the boat can pick it up later. It's a problem of separating the diver(s) from the smb, which unless you have a backup spool and smb, you're now doing a blue water ascent with no reference, no ability to signal the boat so tracking divers can be an issue in current, no redundant buoyancy if you need it.

    Essentially you go from having and smb and benefitting from its use, to suddenly having none of those benefits. It's not usually an issue in calm recreational diving, but when there's lots of current, a decompression obligation, or an equipment malfunction, the lack of an smb can be quite dangerous. There's a reason technical divers carry two.
     

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