• Welcome to ScubaBoard


  1. Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

    Benefits of registering include

    • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
    • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
    • You can make this box go away

    Joining is quick and easy. Login or Register now by clicking on the button

Compression/workout long sleeve shirt vs. rash guard

Discussion in 'Apparel' started by David R Johnson, Jul 15, 2019.

  1. David R Johnson

    David R Johnson Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: Arkansas, USA
    15
    1
    3
    Question: What is the difference in a compression/workout long sleeve shirt and a rash guard (other than price)? Both should offer UV protection, both hold very little water (dry quick).
     
  2. David R Johnson

    David R Johnson Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: Arkansas, USA
    15
    1
    3
    Perhaps a better question is this: Is there a difference?
     
  3. runsongas

    runsongas Great White

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: California - Bay Area
    3,623
    1,424
    113
    not much of a difference, but i also find the price is no different either. UA heatgear long sleeve (msrp 35) is pretty much the same price as the oneill (msrp 34), quiksilver (msrp 35) or billabong (msrp 39) long sleeve rashguards
     
    David R Johnson likes this.
  4. RainPilot

    RainPilot CCR Instructor Staff Member

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: UAE
    4,079
    3,730
    113
    Different applications. Since they are designed for different purposes, they may have different decisions.

    For example, one of my compression shirts does not have a slick exterior, so any jellyfish etc tend to stick and it gets dirty super fast. Works great for a drysuit base layer though.

    Other compression shirts are low-friction outsides, those should be virtually identical to a rash guard in use.
     
  5. seeker242

    seeker242 DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Pompano Beach, FL
    1,227
    745
    113
    One of the main differences is the stitching seams. Flatlock stitching, placed in a particular pattern, minimizes the chances of chafing. Hence the name "rash guard". A standard athletic shirt may or may not have that kind of design.
     
    ScubaWithTurk likes this.
  6. David R Johnson

    David R Johnson Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: Arkansas, USA
    15
    1
    3
    Thanks for the input.
     
    RainPilot likes this.
  7. -Moe

    -Moe Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: SW Ontario, Canada
    88
    38
    18
    I find that if you use anything other than a rashguard in a pool it may change color such as black turns light brown from the chlorine/bromine.
     
    David R Johnson likes this.
  8. AUSTXDiver

    AUSTXDiver Garibaldi

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Austin
    1
    0
    1
    I've been comparing the materials used. It seems like surf/dive/water sports UPF 50+ skins are a makeup of nylon, spandex, and the compression shirts are polyester.
     
  9. jbb

    jbb Photographer

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Seattle
    1,035
    49
    48
    Polyester is naturally UPF where nylon needs something added to it. UPF also depends on the weave of the garment.
     
  10. Charred

    Charred Barracuda

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Lehigh Valley
    295
    231
    43
    Rash guard comes from Australia where they refer to sunburn as rash. Hence rash guard.
     

Share This Page