CESA theory

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wetb4igetinthewater

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@John C. Ratliff

Maybe mental toughness isn't the right expression, but handling stress and acting on it. I understand that courses were longer with fundamentals addressed. As there were no BCDs, everyone dove a balanced rig. No two day certifications where boxes are checked off.
 

tursiops

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As there were no BCDs, everyone dove a balanced rig.
People were often underweighted, and carried "drop weights" to get them to the bottom of a line and their suit would compress, where they would leave them until it was time to ascend again on the line. Or, they were heavy and just crawled/bounced along the bottom....environmental awareness not having been invented yet. "Balanced" was a nice idea, but could only apply for a single depth (because of suit compression) and a single time (because of using up air in the tank).
 

lowwall

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What most people don't realize is that it isn't "mental toughness" that is required, but relaxation and knowledge that we have the ability to deal with these situations. It has to do more with being comfortable in the water, and any thought of "toughness." It seems that we are allowing people into scuba who simply are not comfortable with being underwater, or even in the water. That means that with a simple problem, they are pushed over the edge mentally...

I feel it is a fallacy to say that the ability to perform in the water was "mental toughness." Rather, it has to do with being relaxed in the water, and thinking through different problems. I had to do that last summer, when my tank slipped out of a new (to me) BCD harness while I was diving. Here's the video I made of how that happened, and how I resolved the problem.


SeaRat
That is a great video for teaching how a diver how to react to a problem. Not because he handles everything slickly, but exactly because he doesn't. He is using unfamiliar equipment and makes multiple mistakes because of it, but it doesn't matter one bit. He stays calm and works through each of the issues.

That's the takeaway and any aspiring or nervous diver seeing this video should be reassured that you don't have to be Superdiverman to handle problems without bolting for the surface.

Edit: @John C. Ratliff, what do you do with shopping carts when not interrupted? Fill them up with other trash and trolley them to the surface?
 

BoltSnap

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Mrs.AD would be the classic DM lead diver that nobody would want has a dive buddy.
Don't mean to sound harsh I love her but facts are facts.

Mrs. AD is the perfect student that would separate the good instructor from the check list instructor. I would love to work with her to get her trained and be a competent diver. If she knows how to swim and is comfortable being in the water and has no medical issues, I am up for the challenge. It just have to be in Libya however :p
 

AfterDark

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T
Mrs. AD is the perfect student that would separate the good instructor from the check list instructor. I would love to work with her to get her trained and be a competent diver. If she knows how to swim and is comfortable being in the water and has no medical issues, I am up for the challenge. It just have to be in Libya however :p
That was the point of my post, she is not comfortable in the water and can barely swim because she isn't comfortable enough in the water to really learn how to swim. She now has a heart condition that would preclude her from diving. She has been content to snorkel and has had some very interesting and enjoyable snorkeling adventures such as swimming with manatees and Crystal Springs. Neither of us have passports or have any desire to travel outside the USA but thanks anyway.
 

BoltSnap

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she is not comfortable in the water and can barely swim because she isn't comfortable enough in the water to really learn how to swim

Yes, that doesn't help at all in learning scuba, I am not a swim instructor.
 

Alaskan Scuba Dude

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Interesting question. My inexperience would lead me to believe that the bends would be better than drowning. Plus, I have alimony payment obligations.

Maybe in icy water you would get a first stage freezing up.
 
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