Alkin W31 vs Bauer Oceanus E1 - A Review

Please register or login

Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

Benefits of registering include

  • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
  • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
  • You can make this box go away

Joining is quick and easy. Log in or Register now!

Strata5

Registered
Messages
24
Reaction score
5
Location
Austin, TX
# of dives
50 - 99
I’m making this post to share my experience recently purchasing both an Alkin W31 (gasoline powered) and Bauer Oceanus E1 (single-phase electric) compressor, in addition to my initial impressions with each. This is going to be a long-winded post, but maybe if you’re interested in either compressor you will find value in my shared experience.

TLDR - A costlier compressor is better built, has better support documentation, and can be trusted more to provide true EN12021-grade air. Who’da thought! But seriously, I have real concerns about Alkin’s official documentation on compressor operation, their quality control, and their support philosophy. I explain more below.

Let’s get started- First, I want to make it clear that I understand that I am comparing a ~$3750 compressor with one that is ~$6500+ – Not apples to apples, and I do feel that Alkin is doing their best to provide a good value compressor. Having said that, I my experience with the Alkin left a bad taste in my mouth (almost literally), and I don’t trust them to provide the quality of air SCUBA warrants... at least with the gasoline powered W31. So, let’s break this down:

Purchasing:

Alkin -
Buying both compressors was simple and straightforward. I purchased the Alkin W31 online. Shortly after ordering, I was contacted by the online retailer and asked a few questions- DIN or Yoke fill adapter (I told them DIN)? What pressure did I want my overpressure valve set to from the factory (I told them 3700 PSI)? Eventually the Alkin W31 was delivered to my home about a month later (delays were due to northeast freezing weather causing freight delays). Shipping was “free” (it’s really built into the purchasing price…).


Bauer - Purchasing the Bauer required me to call my nearest authorized Bauer distributor. They asked me the same questions. Yoke or DIN? What over pressure setting from the factory? I gave them the same answers. Shipping was going to be around $300 from Norfolk, VA- But in an act of madness, I opted to drive from central Texas to pick up the Oceanus E1 from Bauer directly, so that I could take a tour of their factory. The tour was amazing, since it was very cool to see the variety of machines and facilities that turn raw materials into seriously high-quality parts, and ultimately, compressors.

Some things to note on the Oceanus – Preparing the Oceanus’ home required a good deal of homework and prep. You’ll need a 240-volt, 30-amp capable power outlet to operate the compressor. I tested actual power draw during operation at 500PSI and at 3500 PSI. It is 4000 watts at the breaker @ 500 PSI, and 4200 watts at the breaker @ 3500 PSI. I had to run 8-gauge wire from a new breaker around to the back porch. From there I had to buy an 8-guage 'pigtail' (I went with 16' length for portability) and plumb it all together at the Oceanus' motor's power box. You’ll also need a switch to turn it on and off unless you are content with simply plugging it in/unplugging it for operation- which I don’t recommend. It does not include a switch. Bauer expects the customer to provide (and be knowledgeable of) the facilities necessary to operate high-end ‘industrial’ equipment. That or they expect you to hire an electrician to do all of the set-up work and thinking for you 😊


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Alkin W31 (gasoline powered) vs Oceanus E1 when dealing with carbon monoxide:



Alkin – Sigh. Here is where I started to have issues with this compressor. I read the manual thoroughly before use. I used their included 36” intake hose and took it upon myself to add a 6-ft 1.5” PVC extension to their included hose to help ensure that the intake port was not drawing in excess carbon monoxide from engine exhaust. I also (in hindsight, incorrectly) assumed that their filtration media included the necessary filtration media to remove carbon monoxide from the filtered air (just in case!). In my mind, “why wouldn’t it?”, it’s a gasoline powered compressor. Wouldn’t it be dangerous to ship a filter with the compressor that didn’t filter carbon monoxide? I was wrong…

After multiple dives spanning a few weeks, my wife and I had been suffering from symptoms that indicate carbon monoxide poisoning since we started to use the compressor (severe headaches, cherry red lips, etc).

After noticing these repeated symptoms, I bit the bullet and purchased a CO gas analyzer to check for excess carbon monoxide buildup in our Alkin filled SCUBA cylinders. I tested ours and found that several cylinders were measuring 21+ PPM CO. When dealing with partial pressure increases during diving, CO is extremely dangerous stuff. I was astonished when I found this, not actually expecting to find such high levels of CO. So, I contacted Alkin via email. Instead of responding via email, they instead called me.

Over the phone, Alkin dismissed my concerns saying that the carbon monoxide issue was “user-error”. They said that the included intake hose that comes with the compressor is “never intended to be used by itself, but that I should have added a longer 1.5 inch PVC extension to the included flexible hose to make sure the intake wouldn't draw in exhaust fumes from the engine” (which I had already done on my own initiative). I'd like to mention that none of this is in their manual (or anywhere else)… But totally, user error. Right.

Alkin said that if my compressor has a metal filter cartridge, then it does not include “hopcalite”, the filtration media responsible for converting carbon monoxide into nominal levels of CO2. Alkin then said that only “the plastic, factory sealed filter cartridge (which they sell) includes hopcalite”. I opened my compressor to find that it was shipped to me with the metal filtration cartridge.

They added that the use of the plastic, hopcalite-containing filter (which is designed to remove carbon monoxide) isn't included in the gas-powered compressor because "you don't need it if the compressor isn't drawing in exhaust fumes from the engine", lol.

In my opinion (given the severity of carbon monoxide poisoning in diving) this should absolutely be included in any gas-powered compressor sold.

They told me that I “was the first customer to be having these issues”. To which I responded if they knew “how many of their home-use customers are testing their gas-powered W31 compressors for carbon monoxide with a $400 CO gas analyzer”? To this they had no response.

Here’s my point. Don’t ship a gas-powered compressor without a CO capable filter. IT IS IRRESPONSIBLE. It is my understanding that Bauer simply WILL NOT sell you a gas powered (or even usually electric powered) compressor without hopcalite filled filtration cartridges.


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Cheap quality engine substituted without any price decrease to accommodate the difference:

Alkin -
It says in the manual that the W31 (when equipped with a gasoline engine) is supposed to get a Honda GX-series 160 engine. This is a commercial-grade small engine. What came instead was an economy-grade Briggs and Stratton. This was frustrating to discover as the Honda is built with much higher quality internal components.


1659344356014.png



When I brought this issue up with Alkin, they said they had to switch to the Briggs engine “due to supply chain issues and unstable pricing with the Honda.” Sure, okay, but sub the Honda for a commercial-grade Briggs, then- not their low-tier economy line. And update your manual!


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Alkin gasoline splashing:


To illustrate this point on Briggs quality further, when I received the Alkin compressor brand-new, during my first use the compressor start splashing gasoline everywhere and the engine began ‘bogging’ under load. I thoroughly checked hose fittings and other places around the fuel tank to ensure that there was no leak. After not too long, I found that the compressor’s carburetor bowl had been fastened to the carburetor at an angle, with the seal of the bowl not resting flush against the carburetor. When I brought this up with Alkin, they sent me a Youtube video, made by Alkin, on how to fix this issue. It was an extremely simple fix, but if it’s such a known issue that you’ve gone out of your way to make a YouTube video for it, why isn’t this specific issue being checked for, as quality assurance, before shipping to the customer?

Here is a picture of the problem. The slot that the bowl fits in to was misaligned. The bowl was tightened half-way onto this slot, causing the bowl to not seal properly, splashing gas:


1659344374451.png




------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Alkin No Hour Meter, despite the “Standard Features” list saying it included one:


Maybe I can’t read properly, or my ADD makes me interpret things differently, but I took this to indicate that the Alkin should include an integrated hour-meter as a standard feature. It doesn’t. This page was on their website (which they have since changed):

1659344401208.png

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
OP
Strata5

Strata5

Registered
Messages
24
Reaction score
5
Location
Austin, TX
# of dives
50 - 99
Alkin’s absurd filter replacement life claims:

Alkin states in their manual that replacing the W31 Compressor filter "every 50 hours" is enough to adhere to EN12021 air quality standards. This, however, is vastly exaggerated and unrealistic. Take for instance the Bauer Mariner 250 with the P31 filter (a much higher capacity filter than the Alkin P21 filter). The service life of the filter found in this Bauer is as follows:

1659345152152.png


You will see that ambient temperature plays a vital role in determining the usable life of the filter. "Usable life" meaning ability to produce EN12021-grade air. Under the absolute best circumstances, running the Bauer Mariner 250 with P31 filter at 0 degrees celsius ambient temperate, the P31 filter cartridge has a usable life of 58 hours, 40 minutes.

How is it possible that the Alkin (with a much smaller filter cartridge than the filter found in the Bauer Mariner 250) can be operated safely for '50 hours', all-the-while producing true EN12021-grade air? The Alkin W31 Manual says:

1659345161737.png



Alkin says that the life of the cartridge "may vary depending on the ambient temperature and humidity", but they provide no way to accurately determine what that temperature impact translates to. You're only told "50 hrs." is the replacement time.

Like the carbon monoxide issue, this is another safety concern of mine which is unique to the Alkin. The impact of operating a filter past its service life is:
  1. Too much water vapor entering the SCUBA cylinder, leading to (esp in steel tanks) premature and unsafe interior wall deterioration/corrosion.
  2. Too much water vapor drastically impacts the ability of the filter media (activated carbon, and hopcalite for carbon monoxide removal) to effectively do their job.

Working with high pressure vessels in breathing applications like SCUBA (dealing with partial pressure increases, etc.) warrants detailed and accurate documentation- Documentation that Alkin is lacking right now.

Bauer - Nowhere in their manual does Bauer suggest you’ll be getting 50 hours life from their filter on the Oceanus compressor. They provide a chart that allows you to calculate (based on ambient operating temperatures) your ‘adjusted filter life’, so that you can more safely and accurately replace your filter cartridge on-time, prevent excess water vapor from ruining the other filtration media or your SCUBA cylinders. FOR CONTRAST, YOU CAN EXPECT AROUND 12 hours OF FILTER LIFE AT 81 DEGREES F AMBIENT TEMPERATURE. THIS IS REALISTIC. 50 HOURS IS RIDICULOUS.


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Over pressure valve setting from the factory:

Alkin - This one is short. Despite being asked what I wanted the over-pressure valve to be adjusted to after purchase (I said 3700 PSI), the Alkin arrived set to 4500 PSI. It was clear that they had not bothered to adjust it.

Bauer - The Bauer arrived correctly set to 3700 PSI, with a small, stamped metal tag to show that the OPV was set to “3700”.


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Oil ‘consumption’:

Alkin - After only two hours of compressor operation, the Alkin was releasing a significant amount of oil when performing the necessary moister purge. Seriously, it was several drops of oil coming out during every 10 minute purge cycle.

Bauer – Hardly any oil is released during the necessary moister purge cycle (every 15 minutes on the Bauer). What is released is almost all water. After an 1H 20M of continuous running, and filling 5x HP 100 steel tanks, the amount of oil in the water from the Bauer still looked to be less than the Alkin’s one single purge cycle.


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

IN SUMMARY (and not surprisingly):

The Bauer hasn’t had any of the issues listed above.

  • The Bauer filtration cartridge is designed to remove CO, despite being an electric compressor.
  • The Bauer manual describes how to calculate filter life based on your ambient temperature.
  • The Bauer arrived with a properly adjusted over pressure valve
  • The Bauer exhaust much less oil during the necessary incremental moister purges
The overall fit and finish of the Alkin is fine. The Bauer does “feel” more premium. The Bauer vibrates a lot less. This has some to do with the electric motor for sure, but I feel that the Bauer compressor block is also better balanced internally. The anti-corrosive coating on the Bauer feels more substantial, and the machining of individual parts are ‘cleaner’, if that makes sense. Like, parts look and feel smoother and better made.

Overall, the Alkin seems more like a paintball compressor than a SCUBA compressor. With the correct filtration cartridge it’ll do the job, but I know which compressor I would trust more to deliver ‘grade E’ air consistently.


Thanks for reading!





P.S. - Just in case he see's this, yes, @iain/hsm I am eating crow, LOL.


1659356328777.png


The experience with these two compressors has actually been an incredibly fun learning experience.
 

kashoqamaher

Registered
Messages
26
Reaction score
13
Location
New Jersey
At Alkin Compressors every time we receive an order, we contact the customer directly on the phone to find out the intended purpose of the compressor, such as for air gun, scuba, paintball, etc. In this call we ask about the environmental conditions the compressor will be operated in, the operating pressure, the type of fill valve needed (yoke, din, quick connect, etc.).


February 7th, 2022, we received this order which was purchased online through scuba.com, not directly from us. This order was shipped February 8th, 2022. During those two days we tried contacting this customer plenty of times to verify the operating pressure and etc. with no response. The order was shipped as it came in. The order was then received on February 25th, 2022, which was in exactly two weeks, as shown in the picture below. The customer did not reach out till a month later on the phone April 13th. The customer informed us about the carbon monoxide issue he was having as well as other issues and that he wanted to return the product. We will be addressing all issues below.

The compressor order came in as 4,000 PSI working pressure and with a standard repackable aluminum cartridge. The compressor comes with a 36-inch flexi adaptor hose. The purpose of this adaptor hose is to avoid the vibration when pipping the compressors intake to the pipe/hose that will bring the intake away from the exhaust. In our phone conversation with him he said he was not aware that he had to put the compressors intake away from the motors exhaust. This addresses the carbon monoxide issue. Being a diver and filling your own tank requires some prior knowledge and homework. We are a compressor manufacturer, not a diver operation instructor. We also offered a free plastic purifier cartridge which may assist in helping the carbon monoxide issue a little... but he refused it. If we were able to get a hold of the customer to find out his conditions, we would have informed him about the intake hose and purifier cartridge that he needs to select. Since we received no response, the order was shipped as it came in.


Briggs is not a cheap quality motor. Briggs is a USA made motor. There is a gas strain at the bottom of the carburetor to remove air from the gas line if there is any, in order to give the motor an easier start. Tightening the bolt would fix the gas leak situation he was having and any gas motor operator would be aware of this… a little more homework needed.



All electric compressors and battery-operated gas compressors have an hour meter, since hour meters require electric to run off of. The compressor purchased by the customer was a base manual design which obviously can’t have an hour meter. We offered a free vibration activated hour meter to take care of the customer but once again he refused.



Our 50 hours lifetime on the P21 purifier filter is the maximum possible run time. Depending on the environmental conditions this can be shortened, which is out of our control.



Our compressors don’t consume a significant amount of oil. Oil changes are every 250 hours. If our compressors are consumed this much oil the oil change time would be a lot less, like some of our competitors. Some oil residue is expected from the water separator discharge since these are oil flooded compressors. Pistons and valves need lubrication while operating. This just shows us that the Alkin water separator works very well. We regularly do air tests on our compressors receiving Grade E results every time. None of our compressors leave the factory without air sample test.



When comparing a gas operated compressor versus an electric operated compressor, of course there will be more vibration on the gas compressor. The two aren’t comparable. An electric Alkin compressor has very slight vibration since it runs only on 1050 RPM. This is the lowest RPM air compressor in its segment. All competitors are around 2000 RPM. Due to the low RPM, this compressor is also quieter with 82 dBA sound level only.



Overall, we believe we are providing outstanding service and good quality compressors to the market with the best prices and lead times. We are one of the only companies offering two years warranty. We care about our customers and have received 5-star reviews. Doing more research into our company will only show positive experiences. This post appears to be focused on hate rather than the truth, feels like it could even be a paid ad.
 

Attachments

  • reciept for scuba board final.jpg
    reciept for scuba board final.jpg
    20 KB · Views: 11

iain/hsm

Contributor
Messages
932
Reaction score
533
Location
uk
Briggs is not a cheap quality motor. Briggs is a USA made motor.

Yeah you sure about that. LOL

Briggs & Stratton (Shanghai) International Trading Co., Ltd

Kind of beggars the question of why the big play on an American made motor
While pushing a piece of low pressure crap out of Turkey. Just saying.

Our compressors don’t consume a significant amount of oil. Oil changes are every 250 hours.
By contrast to an American made high pressure compressor that requires oil changes every 6000 hours.
Just saying.

An electric Alkin compressor has very slight vibration since it runs only on 1050 RPM. This is the lowest RPM air compressor in its segment. All competitors are around 2000 RPM. Due to the low RPM, this compressor is also quieter with 82 dBA sound level only
Which beggars the question of why and how does it run at 1050 RPM exactly and
What is the downside of this type of design? Just saying



 
OP
Strata5

Strata5

Registered
Messages
24
Reaction score
5
Location
Austin, TX
# of dives
50 - 99
Thank you for the response. I'll take some time to clarify a few things, and want to keep this polite and respectful. I didn't say the product was garbage, which is what I think you're insinuating. I said that proper accurate documentation was lacking, and I didn't trust the compressor to consistently deliver true EN12021-grade air, and then I proceeded to provide the reasons >I< felt this way.

Alkin was kind enough to allow me to return the product, and I sincerely appreciated that. Thank you. I will reply in-turn to the comments below:

At Alkin Compressors every time we receive an order, we contact the customer directly on the phone to find out the intended purpose of the compressor, such as for air gun, scuba, paintball, etc. In this call we ask about the environmental conditions the compressor will be operated in, the operating pressure, the type of fill valve needed (yoke, din, quick connect, etc.).

We can both blame Scuba.com for this, then. I was never contacted by Alkin directly after purchase to finalize these details. Scuba.com called me and asked me only: "DIN or Yoke", and "What do you want your service pressure set to?" That's literally it.

February 7th, 2022, we received this order which was purchased online through scuba.com, not directly from us. This order was shipped February 8th, 2022. During those two days we tried contacting this customer plenty of times to verify the operating pressure and etc. with no response. The order was shipped as it came in. The order was then received on February 25th, 2022, which was in exactly two weeks, as shown in the picture below. The customer did not reach out till a month later on the phone April 13th. The customer informed us about the carbon monoxide issue he was having as well as other issues and that he wanted to return the product. We will be addressing all issues below.

We can both blame Scuba.com for this, then. I was never contacted by Alkin (or Scuba.com) directly after purchase to finalize these details. The compressor was promptly shipped, yes. Freight delays due to weather was the hold up, which I said above.

It took me a few weeks of using the compressor to realize something was wrong, purchase a CO analyzer, test, test again, and realize that yes, we were suffering from a CO problem.


The compressor order came in as 4,000 PSI working pressure and with a standard repackable aluminum cartridge. The compressor comes with a 36-inch flexi adaptor hose. The purpose of this adaptor hose is to avoid the vibration when pipping the compressors intake to the pipe/hose that will bring the intake away from the exhaust. In our phone conversation with him he said he was not aware that he had to put the compressors intake away from the motors exhaust. This addresses the carbon monoxide issue. Being a diver and filling your own tank requires some prior knowledge and homework. We are a compressor manufacturer, not a diver operation instructor. We also offered a free plastic purifier cartridge which may assist in helping the carbon monoxide issue a little... but he refused it. If we were able to get a hold of the customer to find out his conditions, we would have informed him about the intake hose and purifier cartridge that he needs to select. Since we received no response, the order was shipped as it came in.

1. I never said I didn't put the intake away from the engine exhaust. In fact, at that point in time I had already added a 6' 1.5 in. PVC extension to the included 36" flex hose because it seemed as though the included hose was inadequate (when used alone) to prevent exhaust gasses from being pulled in. Again - The manual didn't tell me to do this. I did it on my own- A detail and expectation that I believe should be strongly conveyed in the Users Manual.

2. We can both blame Scuba.com for this, then. I was never contacted by Alkin directly after purchase to finalize these details. I was only ever contacted by Scuba.com. They did not ask me this question.

Note: This lack of detail is why I said that this compressor feels more like a paintball compressor than a SCUBA compressor. Who cares if CO gets into paintball applications. But for SCUBA, spell it out - If the included hose isn't long enough to do the job, then say so in the book that comes with the compressor that is arriving, seemingly ready for use, without a CO-removing filter installed beforehand. I added a 6" PVC pipe on own initiative prior to that phone call. Someone else someday may not, and that is dangerous.

Briggs is not a cheap quality motor. Briggs is a USA made motor. There is a gas strain at the bottom of the carburetor to remove air from the gas line if there is any, in order to give the motor an easier start. Tightening the bolt would fix the gas leak situation he was having and any gas motor operator would be aware of this… a little more homework needed.

1. It is a cheap quality motor. It uses nylon gears instead of metal - Don't take my word for it -

  • Briggs 750 Series disassembly - Plastic internal gear @ 8m 44s into the video:
  • Honda GX 160 disassembly - All metal internal gears @ 4m 49s into the video:
    • Honda GX engines used forged crankshafts, cams, high quality bearings and cast iron sleeves, all metal gears, no dumb timing belts, etc., overall they're simply more robust engines. So it cannot be said that the Briggs (750 series) is "not a cheap quality motor". It is a cheap engine. It is designed to meet an economical price point, and the W31 Mariner manual says a Honda GX is to be included. This is simply wrong.
2. It wasn't a problem of being a loose bolt. The bowl itself was not aligned properly when tightened to the carburetor. My point was that this was another point of concern overall with the level of care Alkin placed in their small portable compressor, and in their QA process overall.

All electric compressors and battery-operated gas compressors have an hour meter, since hour meters require electric to run off of. The compressor purchased by the customer was a base manual design which obviously can’t have an hour meter.
I'm sorry that you find the omission of an hour meter "obvious". At the time it was listed as a standard feature.
Our 50 hours lifetime on the P21 purifier filter is the maximum possible run time. Depending on the environmental conditions this can be shortened, which is out of our control.
Then say that in the manual. It's not a question of "can be shortened". It will need to be shortened. Like, a lot. If it's a perfectly stable and never changing 75F outside, you may see 15-17 hours out of the filter before it begins to fail due to moister saturation and is no longer providing the claimed EN12021-grade air.

Note: This lack of detail is why I said that this compressor feels more like a paintball compressor than a SCUBA compressor. In the existing W31 Mariner manual, seen HERE, via this LINK, I see don't provide any way at all to calculate actual filter replacement time based on ambient temperature. As a user I am completely left in the dark. True EN12021 may not be a requirement for someone with a carbon fiber cylinder, but for steel, keeping moister content to a minimum is essential.
 

Attachments

  • 1659477730426.png
    1659477730426.png
    140.8 KB · Views: 25
OP
Strata5

Strata5

Registered
Messages
24
Reaction score
5
Location
Austin, TX
# of dives
50 - 99
Our compressors don’t consume a significant amount of oil. Oil changes are every 250 hours. We regularly do air tests on our compressors receiving Grade E results every time. None of our compressors leave the factory without air sample test.

It says in your manual it's every 100 hours, not 250 hours:

1659480686509.png


Re: regular air test getting Grade E results every time- Is that after you've put 40+ hours on a filter, and then capturing the air sample? Or is that with a brand new filter installed?
When comparing a gas operated compressor versus an electric operated compressor, of course there will be more vibration on the gas compressor. The two aren’t comparable. An electric Alkin compressor has very slight vibration since it runs only on 1050 RPM. This is the lowest RPM air compressor in its segment. All competitors are around 2000 RPM. Due to the low RPM, this compressor is also quieter with 82 dBA sound level only.
I totally agree that gas will vibrate more than electric. That said, the sound level of the compressor is irrelevant if the Briggs and Stratton 750 Series engine itself produces more than 82 dBA.

Overall, we believe we are providing outstanding service and good quality compressors to the market with the best prices and lead times. We are one of the only companies offering two years warranty. We care about our customers and have received 5-star reviews. Doing more research into our company will only show positive experiences. This post appears to be focused on hate rather than the truth, feels like it could even be a paid ad.

I've focused on what I feel are is important, here. Nothing more. I do believe that Alkin sells compressors capable of Grade-E air under the understanding that you operate the compressor in a way that is not made abundantly clear in the User Manual.

I do believe that what Alkin is selling has the potential to be an incredible value, esp. the electric motor version (which wouldn't have to contend with CO), generally speaking.

Overall it simply felt as though the gas-powered W31 Mariner & its support documentation were an afterthought for Alkin. But that's just my opinion.

I'll address this one last point. The Bauer wasn't without its faults. It was a real PITA to set up. I had to figure out where I was going to mount the exterior power outlet, where I was then going to mount the power switch, run the conduit, pull the wire, install the breaker, etc. Something that would have run me an extra $1500 to have done by an electrician.

The simple fact that I had to buy an on/off switch for the Bauer was really frustrating. My thoughts were "Seriously? You spend this much on a compressor and it doesn't come with a SWITCH!? To add it that that, it too, despite being electric, doesn't include an hour meter. This, in my opinion, is absurd.

Alkin, I know that your electric compressor includes an hour meter, and that's fantastic. Seriously, thank you.


1659480712159.png
 

BoltSnap

Contributor
Scuba Instructor
Messages
9,474
Reaction score
5,279
Location
Nomad
# of dives
I'm a Fish!
Yeah you sure about that. LOL

Briggs & Stratton (Shanghai) International Trading Co., Ltd

Kind of beggars the question of why the big play on an American made motor
While pushing a piece of low pressure crap out of Turkey. Just saying.


By contrast to an American made high pressure compressor that requires oil changes every 6000 hours.
Just saying.


Which beggars the question of why and how does it run at 1050 RPM exactly and
What is the downside of this type of design? Just saying

Aren't you a Coltrisub dealer?
 

Curious_George

Green water guy
Messages
471
Reaction score
476
Location
Arkansas
# of dives
200 - 499
@kashoqamaher was more than fair to allow the return after the OP didn’t even have the courtesy to purchase direct from the dealer. A lot of the post is complaining about not having an hour meter or correct filter and wrong motor even though they decided to use the compressor as received. Return it unused if it’s not as described. Once the decision is made to go ahead and use the compressor, complaining about wrong components is just sour grapes.

While it was somewhat buried in the initial posts, I think this thread was clearly intended to bash the Alkin dealer in spite of having chosen to bypass them and go with another seller to save a few bucks. I’m giving this post a big thumbs down.

:disagree:

I suggest the OP had no idea what they were doing and made some poor choices - before trying to feel better by blaming someone else. They didn’t have enough knowledge or experience to check that they were using the right filter or ensure the setup was adequate to prevent CO in the output. Thank goodness this isn’t a fatality story, and only a scary near miss!

Lastly, there was clear guidance given about this compressor that was ignored. I imagine Alkin is probably a fine compressor for the price, if someone knows what they are doing. In this case, looking for a free lunch ended up with just deserts, and thank goodness just a stern warning.
 

BoltSnap

Contributor
Scuba Instructor
Messages
9,474
Reaction score
5,279
Location
Nomad
# of dives
I'm a Fish!
@kashoqamaher was more than fair to allow the return after the OP didn’t even have the courtesy to purchase direct from the dealer. A lot of the post is complaining about not having an hour meter or correct filter and wrong motor even though they decided to use the compressor as received. Return it unused if it’s not as described. Once the decision is made to go ahead and use the compressor, complaining about wrong components is just sour grapes.

While it was somewhat buried in the initial posts, I think this thread was clearly intended to bash the Alkin dealer in spite of having chosen to bypass them and go with another seller to save a few bucks. I’m giving this post a big thumbs down.

:disagree:

I suggest the OP had no idea what they were doing and made some poor choices - before trying to feel better by blaming someone else. They didn’t have enough knowledge or experience to check that they were using the right filter or ensure the setup was adequate to prevent CO in the output. Thank goodness this isn’t a fatality story, and only a scary near miss!

Lastly, there was clear guidance given about this compressor that was ignored. I imagine Alkin is probably a fine compressor for the price, if someone knows what they are doing. In this case, looking for a free lunch ended up with just deserts, and thank goodness just a stern warning.

Well put and said, I couldn't have said it better.

Bravo!
 

Top Bottom