Please register or login

Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

Benefits of registering include

  • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
  • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
  • You can make this box go away

Joining is quick and easy. Log in or Register now!

urmaddad

Contributor
Messages
125
Reaction score
37
Location
East Bay Area, San Ramon
I'm curious as to what make this scuba diving equipment is. The only clue is a date of 1954.
scubaholes1.jpg
 

Rol diy

Contributor
Messages
778
Reaction score
497
Location
Ont
I would say its definitely a rebreather,

It does sorta look like it,
That is a long hose for a pendulum rebreather,
Wob must be quite bad, at least the dead space is less with a small bore hose :wink:
 

Akimbo

Just a diver
Staff member
ScubaBoard Supporter
Messages
12,515
Reaction score
11,002
Location
Mendocino, CA USA
I know nothing about rebreathers, but might there be some connection between the devices in the picture and the war surplus MSA Mark III oxygen rebreathers at Photos MSA Mark III? At the very least, the holes in the housing seem to match.

Agreed. Here is a link with more info:


You have to wonder what the designers were thinking with such a long inhalation/exhalation hose. I guess that CO2 is not as big a problem at altitude.

1652364217450.png
 

broncobowsher

Contributor
Messages
2,657
Reaction score
2,190
Location
Arizona
Radium backlit pressure gauge no less.
I was thinking of where the couple start diving, first time ever, one of which with a rebreather. This says 1960s. But it is a different style now that I look at it.

Yes, this stuff did exist.
 

Akimbo

Just a diver
Staff member
ScubaBoard Supporter
Messages
12,515
Reaction score
11,002
Location
Mendocino, CA USA
Only one of there models were for scuba use. The rest for miners.

Apparently one model was for military aircraft. See the link on post #4.

The military was using Christian J. Lambertsen's LARU rebreather underwater. It is a good bet that there were a lot of the MSA units made for aircraft in war war surplus stores in the late 1940s through the 1960s. The bags/counterlungs and hoses were probably globs of sticky gum after that.

I doubt that the LARUs made it to the surplus market because they were made in very small quantities. The dramatically-reduced post-war UDT started training on them soon after the war. Underwater activities of the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) were absorbed by the Navy UDT after the war. The various units that merged to become the UDT were not using breathing apparatus, except for the OSS.
 

Top Bottom