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Wreckage Recovery from 900 feet

Discussion in 'Wreck Exploration and Expeditions' started by Fzaheer, Jul 26, 2014.

  1. 2cold4california

    2cold4california Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: CA
    71
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    Nice job cherry picking 5 years worth of statistics in an industry that is disappearing. Care to quote OSHA for 1980-2008?? Here I'll help you out!

    http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00053331.htm?mobile=nocontent

    During 1989-1997, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recorded 116 occupational diving fatalities in the United States (OSHA, unpublished data, 1998). * During 1990-1997, nine persons in Alaska died in work-related diving incidents (four were investigated by OSHA); only one had training beyond a recreational diving certificate, and three lacked any certification. In response to concerns about adequate training of occupational divers in Alaska and recent public inquiry, CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) reviewed the nine occupational diving fatalities in Alaska. ** This report describes three of these incidents, summarizes the results of the review, and provides recommendations to improve the safety of commercial diving.

    https://fiskusa.com/blog/offshore-oilfield-consultants/offshore-workers-more-likely-to-die-on-job/

    "Still, the fatality rate for offshore oil and gas workers was found to be 27.1 deaths per 100,000 workers compared to the average 3.8 deaths. "

    http://www.wrightroy.com/legal-news/maritime-industry-has-greatest-number-of-fatalities/

    "Maritime Industry Has Greatest Number of Fatalities
    According to an April 2013 study by the CDC, Offshore workers in the Oil and Gas Industry are seven times more likely to be killed on the job than workers in any other industry. The study considered offshore fatalities between 2003-2010, with 27.1 deaths versus 3.8 deaths per 100,000 workers. Transportation was cited as the most dangerous aspect of the job, with 51% attributed to transportation accidents. Fatality information was obtained from the Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Industries. To read the full study, titled Fatal Injuries in Offshore Oil and Gas Operations — United States, 2003–2010, click here."

    http://timhettler.tumblr.com/post/46395722645/diving-deep-into-danger


    It's so easy to prove you wrong lol!

    ---------- Post added July 27th, 2014 at 05:43 PM ----------

    I don't dive as a profession. I'm smart enough to make a living otherwise. It's hilarious to me how condescending you commercial guys sound when you are basically expendable to the oil company. "You're an errand boy, sent by grocery clerks to collect a bill"


    Come at me with your best argument, you will lose. So instead you say "this guy...." Well guess what "this guy"
    will make you look like a fool if you don't know what you're talking about.



    Why can't you refute what I say if it's wrong?
     
  2. tursiops

    tursiops Marine Scientist and Master Instructor ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: U.S. East Coast
    7,137
    4,519
    113
    You are having some problems with reading comprehension, it seems. I'm talking diving fatalities in saturation diving....you are talking about the entire industry.
    I see no point in further discussion on this. Your hole is so deep I can hardly see you down there.
     
  3. 2cold4california

    2cold4california Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: CA
    71
    4
    0
    You quoted 2008-2013. where are the rest?



    Good, run away, you wouldn't do well in this argument and you haven't so far.

    ---------- Post added July 27th, 2014 at 05:52 PM ----------

    Here is a pertinent abstract on the health of divers doing this dives over ten years. They found bubbles in their brains! Almost all of the divers had serious medical issues as a result of the work they did.

    ---------- Post added July 27th, 2014 at 05:53 PM ----------

    http://www.hse.gov.uk/research/rrpdf/rr244.pdf
     
  4. Dr. Lecter

    Dr. Lecter Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: NYC/Honolulu
    4,139
    2,921
    113
    I'm not a professional diver of any kind - my profession generally involves handling large banks and hedge funds' pre-indictment problems, though I'm happy to work on whatever's interesting and has large enough margins to justify our hourly rates. While I only take my CCR out for fun, your posts show that of the two of us, I'm the one who knows what he's talking about vis-à-vis risks inherent in deep diving.

    But, since Akimbo is here, I can just sit back and watch a blustering ignorance make a fool of himself. :popcorn:
     
  5. 2cold4california

    2cold4california Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: CA
    71
    4
    0
    I'm watching you right now, I guess you found a mirror. You have nothing to contribute, thanks, sit down and let the adults work this out :wink:



    Omg lol I didn't even read your post! Hedge funds? RFLMAO Seriously I love how people love to pretend on the internet. Talk big act small that's your motto!
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2014
  6. Dr. Lecter

    Dr. Lecter Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: NYC/Honolulu
    4,139
    2,921
    113
    Whatever you say. Would this particular "adult" like to tell the thread if he's actually got 50-99 dives after his 14 years of diving? Might help us all work out how full of :censored: he is :wink:
     
  7. 2cold4california

    2cold4california Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: CA
    71
    4
    0
    What mod is hiding your summary ownage from the world? Come on if you guys are killing it so bad why hide the thread?


    I'm glad I can still embarrass a few so called experts for fun. You guys are a laugh. Unhide the thread mod and I'll reply

    ---------- Post added July 27th, 2014 at 06:13 PM ----------

    Dog I'm saturation diving right now. Wifi in the chamber.


    For real you look like a joke and you should thank the mod for hiding your stupidity. Bye
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 28, 2014
  8. boulderjohn

    boulderjohn Technical Instructor ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Boulder, CO
    25,635
    17,010
    113


    A ScubaBoard Staff Message...

    OK, folks.

    The OP asked a very specific question about a very advanced topic, one beyond the scope of all but a small percentage of ScubaBoard participants. I am not one of them. The discussion started well, but it has become increasingly hostile and unhelpful. In my inexpert opinion, much of what has happened in the last few posts has been extremely unhelpful, focusing more on personal attacks than facts and other helpful information. Please refrain from such personal attacks, or I might have to come in, very regretfully, with a delete hammer to cull them out. I would personally much prefer to read all the new (to me) and interesting information that was characteristic of the first part of the conversation.
     
    SeaHorse81 likes this.
  9. Akimbo

    Akimbo Lift to Freedom Volunteer Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

    8,682
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    Yes, working offshore is dangerous work, but far from the most dangerous. However, your safety assertions for saturation divers are simply unfounded. For example, 52,537 man-hours in saturation during 2010 were conducted in the Norwegian Sector of the North Sea alone.

    Norway: New Report on Diving Related Accidents Launched| Offshore Energy Today

    To be fair, the death rate in the late 1960s and very early 1970s was pretty high in the North Sea. Some estimates were as high as 13% of active offshore divers. That may be where you get your false impression. However, the majority were surface supplied or deep bounce dive operations using small bell and chamber systems, not saturation. It was also a "wild west" period and long before purpose built DSVs (Diving Support Vessels). Saturation diving was a very new technology as was dynamic positioning that most DSVs depended on.

    Another source of the misconception is media exaggeration for dramatic impact (ratings) and diver bravado. The more dangerous the perception the higher diver pay is likely to be. There is no doubt it is potentially dangerous work. You basically have the most complex diving operations ever conceived plus all the dangers of offshore heavy construction. The fact that there are so few injuries is a tribute to the diligence of crews and some interesting economic factors. DSVs that lease for hundreds of thousands of dollars a day will often go off contract with a diver casualty. An egregious failure will be punished by the entire loss of contracts than can run for years. This really is a case where safety pays.

    Like the injuries above, the majority of diving injuries are industrial in nature. The most recent saturation deaths I recall are the divers on aboard the DSV Koosha 1 in the Persian Gulf. The vessel sank in bad weather losing 13 people including the 6 divers in sat.

    http://www.scubaboard.com/forums/accidents-incidents/399964-six-divers-trapped-sea-bottom.html

    Reports from divers I respect indicate that the operator and vessel and the diving contractor were not nearly comparable to those operating in the North Sea or US Gulf of Mexico.

    As for depth, 900' isn't excessive technologically or physically. It is very expensive even by offshore oil standards. Nobody in their right mind would use sat divers for work that can be performed by ROVs. One atmosphere suits have not been all that successful because a diver is still at considerable risk and is often less capable than a ROV.
     
  10. 2cold4california

    2cold4california Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: CA
    71
    4
    0
    I personally don't view it as safe. If people want to risk their lives, that is their business, but when I see people advocating 900fsw body retrieval I get annoyed. That's dumb.
     

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