Woman crushed by Humpback whales - Australia

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Wingy

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Im pretty much convinced it's the same mum rightly getting pissed at these flea like intruders so im glad the weather has forced cancellation of all tours and they've said they are examining if guidelines need amending to make way for grouchy mums. Id hazard a guess this particular whale is on ID Databases so a "local" bloody migrant so her response to humans around her calves is really quite valuable data if proven to be the same mum...she's definitely a Sharon (bogun brawling West Aussie version of a Karen)...

Re the red back - I actually knew what I was in for and was 99% sure that was what nailed me due to the slimy goosebumps...a classic sign of an envenomation. I was actually working at Ningaloo on a coastal ecology survey when I did The only useful course ive ever done - remote wound management and suturing - and Id asked about death adder bites because our camp was infested with them so had an idea of how venoms worked. I chose not to go to hospital or have antivenom because somewhere back then I'd researched spider and snake bites and met an old guy who took a full hit from a King Brown and rode it out...for three months.
I spoke with health direct line nurses who were awesome and rang me every couple of hours to see how the ride was and sent a mobile Dr around because one was in the area (first weekend of covid from memory) and she was awesome, took some video, agreed that antivenom can cause side effects for decades and generally agreed i was mentally prepared for what was to come so gave me a lollipop and an energy drink and had a laugh at my slimy reptile skin. She calculated on my bodyweight how long the ride would last and it was quite amazing feeling the different stages of toxins as they worked their way around my body and brain. The floating was nice, the acid flashbacky hypersensitivity was interesting, the bone aches were not. My bone marrow hurt..so yes, an amazing experience that showed me the power of keeping calm and the power of venom....she won, respect Mrs Spider.

Im pretty much all good now, just managed to break my wrist and sesamoid bones in both hands falling over. The unco and the ridiculous narcolepsy was the hardest part to deal with - getting people to understand the reason I just passed out spilling a cup of coffee you just gave me is related to a spider bite three weeks ago is almost impossible. Getting a cop to understand why you're asleep at a green light...well...here come the test swabs :rolleyes:
 

drl

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Australian spider id chart
363FE0F7-C7A1-4E15-99F5-C1ACAB2FF411.jpeg
 

Saniflush

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chillyinCanada

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first time mother
 

AfterDark

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first time mother

Do not know? She looked pretty experienced to me with that gentle maneuver that protected her calf, turned the calf away and moving from the "threat", without hurting anyone. I get the impression it's not her 1st time dealing with pesky humans, IMO.
 

myshadeofred

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I was diving in Hawaii with 5 other friends to include one instructor and a humpback came up to us (about 70 ft depth) ...though completely thrilling, it was terrifying. I have a fear of large animals close to me so I was extra cautious. But you don't know how they will move or how fast. Even though we all had to surface, the beautiful creature stayed with us for about 25 minutes. We weren't allowed to start the boat so we had to wait it out. It seemed this giant was just curious and when it was come to surface it would turn and just look at us, just super curious.

Once in a lifetime experience and with over 300 dives in Hawaii, my only humpback experience.

Though beautiful and graceful, I don't think I would willingly jump in to be that close.
 

Shasta_man

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I had a similar experience (not terrified but it's big and I'm just a flea compared to it) just getting up close to an elephant at a local zoo. You could stand inches from the elephant with nothing in between while it walked around. You get how big it is and effortless it is for it to do what it wants.

Similar to Rottweilers with them doing what you want only because they wanted to.
 
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