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Why don't wings have shoulder dump valves?

Discussion in 'Buoyancy Compensators (BC's) & Weight Systems' started by ssssnake529, Jun 14, 2021.

  1. Wibble

    Wibble Contributor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: UK
    1,005
    755
    As a solo diver, what mitigation strategy do you have in place for its failure?

    (Not picking on you, making the point about redundancy and risk assessment)

    Mine is my drysuit and two SMBs. That and no pull dumps putting strain on the elephant's trunk.
     
  2. SlugMug

    SlugMug Contributor

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Texas
    518
    367
    I'm not the same person, but it depends which failure & where you are in the dive. This was my answer (as a solo-diver):
     
  3. Ana

    Ana Solo Diver

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Pompano Beach, FL
    1,916
    2,635
    My concern is more on the side of releasing the air, instead of inflating the wing. I do carry an SMB but is to avoid getting run over at the surface if I lose the flag.
    The pull mechanism could fail before splashing when I make sure there's no air in the wing, or at the end of the dive when I'm about to surface and also want to remove whatever little air I pumped earlier if needed.

    If it happens before splashing, I'll check the inflator portion. If both things are messed up, we usually have a spare on board or worst case I take my husband's.

    If the failure is at depth at the end of the dive, I'll use the rear dump.

    One could "what if" further, but I generally don't because my current dives are ridiculously easy, always within NDL, rarely deeper than 100', with a 3 mil and a hood at the most.
    Starting next week or maybe the other one up, it will be with just a rash-guard and a hood so the wing will be part of the gear but won't be used at all, unless I find some heavy treasure.
     
  4. boulderjohn

    boulderjohn Technical Instructor ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Boulder, CO
    27,762
    21,449
    This is what I mean by saying that the harm created by a failure depends upon the dive. A dump valve failure in a BCD that does not have much air in it is not a big deal at all. It would not bother me in the slightest.

    I am just repeating that making the absolute statement that an equipment feature is a failure point and therefore should never be used interferes with thinking. If that feature provides a benefit the diver likes, and if the potential for failure is low and the harm from the failure is also low, why not use it?
     
    Ana and Wibble like this.
  5. SlugMug

    SlugMug Contributor

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Texas
    518
    367
    For the air-dump scenario, wouldn't you just lift the hose and push the manual inflate/deflate button?

    Positive buoyancy freaks me out enough I stop ascending using lung-volume or swim down until I can fix it, and that's practical to do, except perhaps at the last 12ft of a dive. Your buoyancy will rapidly increase close to the surface, but you should have just done a safety stop. I usually dump a little more air before surfacing & you could always use the rear dumb valve at a safety stop. Although in a couple cases I had no more air to dump at about 18ft & I was able to surface safely, using decreased lung capacity, with only about the last 3-4ft being uncontrolled positively buoyant. You can also go horizontal to act like a parachute.

    I'm with you there. The failure-cost for an experienced and competent diver should be relatively low, although the risks are worth thinking through. For example, this would give me one extra reason to always carry my DSMB, even if I don't plan to use it, or technically don't need it.
     
  6. boulderjohn

    boulderjohn Technical Instructor ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Boulder, CO
    27,762
    21,449
    A DSMB is a potentially valuable safety aid and easy to carry. I would not bother with one in a small lake, but for other dives I will almost always have one. Search back through old threads in the Cozumel forum and you will find posts over a decade old in which I said SMBs at least should be required there.
     

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