What is a p-valve?

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Pearldiver07

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Thank you. :eyebrow:

Actually, in my case, I consider a pee valve a safety item.

Some time back I took an "undeserved" hit, and the hyberbaric doc said that one of the major contributing factors was being dehydrated. Now I have a pee valve and hydrate up like crazy and life is good.

You know, this is why I took to using the system. I found that I was trying to limit intake for all of the obvious reasons. Now I hydrate much better.

But the comment about other issues is real. You have more personal care to consider and it involves another pre/post dive step to not miss or mess up.

But then again, no such thing as a free lunch, is there?
 

Jim Ernst

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Thank you. :eyebrow:

Actually, in my case, I consider a pee valve a safety item.

Some time back I took an "undeserved" hit, and the hyberbaric doc said that one of the major contributing factors was being dehydrated. Now I have a pee valve and hydrate up like crazy and life is good.

HMM....... That is something I have never heared of or considered.

Interesting point!! thanks for the info!
 

BCSGratefulDiver

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"Is a p-valve something that most would want on their suit or not?"

Not really - unless you plan to spend more than four continuous hours underwater (decompressing).
You kidding me? I can't even sleep for four continuous hours without having to relieve myself. In the water I'm good for about an hour and a half, tops ... then if I'm not plumbed it's either get out ... NOW ... or end up with squishy socks.

They come in handy for other reasons too. I do a lot of shore diving ... sometimes in residential neighborhoods where there aren't any toilets, and it's really bad form to go peeing in some resident's bushes. So I smack on the ol' adhesive snorkel parka and go stand hip deep in the water pretending I'm studying the current or something. I also use it when diving on small boats.

They've got their down sides, to be sure. Urinary tract infections are no fun at all ... and there are some parts of the body where adhesives were just never meant to go. But if you dive a lot ... or just don't want to be cutting your dive short because you gotta go ... or are diving someplace where there just ain't a place to go ... they're a pretty handy thing to have ...

... Bob (Grateful Diver)
 

Solitude Diver

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Thank you. :eyebrow:

Actually, in my case, I consider a pee valve a safety item.

Some time back I took an "undeserved" hit, and the hyberbaric doc said that one of the major contributing factors was being dehydrated. Now I have a pee valve and hydrate up like crazy and life is good.

Ditto! Same thing happened to me. I had gotten in the habit of reducing my water intake just before a dive so I wouldn't have to swim with crossed legs. :no That combined with VERY cold weather, current, and repetitious dives (working on mapping) and WHAM! Chamber time.

Re-plumbed and no worries. I now drink a LOT of water before dives now. (Just don't follow too close) :D
 

Solitude Diver

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They come in handy for other reasons too. I do a lot of shore diving ... sometimes in residential neighborhoods where there aren't any toilets, and it's really bad form to go peeing in some resident's bushes. So I smack on the ol' adhesive snorkel parka and go stand hip deep in the water pretending I'm studying the current or something.

That's a good point too. Been there a few times. Don't tell too many people about the current studying thing though. I'm hoping people are buying that one.:D
 

daniel f aleman

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You kidding me? I can't even sleep for four continuous hours without having to relieve myself.

... Bob (Grateful Diver)

Well, now... you might want to consider relocating to a warm water environment. :D
 

made4water

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There have been a LOT of pro's and con's to the valve.

Um.... it is nice to have yes while many times it has been presented to cause Infections on men where they dont want to get one due to trapped body fluids.

So though many drysuit divers due use them there are many of us that dont.

is there any way to prevent the body fluids from being trapped? Or is it kinda hit or miss?
 

amascuba

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Thank you. :eyebrow:

Actually, in my case, I consider a pee valve a safety item.

Some time back I took an "undeserved" hit, and the hyberbaric doc said that one of the major contributing factors was being dehydrated. Now I have a pee valve and hydrate up like crazy and life is good.

That's the number one reason to have a p-valve in my book.
 

Jim Baldwin

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is there any way to prevent the body fluids from being trapped? Or is it kinda hit or miss?

A pee valve in my opinion is a great investment. You don't have to worry about keeping your dive to about an hour. You can hydrate well and no one knows you are taking care of a little personal business. And if you're planning on doing any deco diving with hour plus run times it is much nicer than trying to wear a big bunch of Pampers or Depends. Then having to deal with that mess once you're out of the water.

For the past two weekends I was diving in 52 and 60 degree water in my drysuit. When I finished my dives I didn't have to rush out and try and strip down to make it to a restroom. The clear plastic party hats aka condom cathers just make diving more enjoyable for me.

As soon after diving as you can get everything off and if you're hydrated well you will flush the system which may help reduce any problems.
 

do it easy

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is there any way to prevent the body fluids from being trapped? Or is it kinda hit or miss?
When I'm putting my gear away, I use a condiment squeeze bootle to flush water through the p-valve. Some people add vinegar, a little bleach, or a disenfectant solution.
 
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