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Weather and stop depths.

Discussion in 'Computers, Gauges, Watches and Analyzers' started by KenGordon, Jan 21, 2020.

  1. KenGordon

    KenGordon Rebreather Pilot

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    Barometric pressure in London 'highest in 300 years' at least London breaks a high-pressure record

    At the weekend it 1050 mb in London (and probably Chepstow) while 970 in Iceland. That is the best part of a metre of difference. Since final stops are at 1300 mb vs 1000ish expected at the surface you can see it might be significant.

    Luckily the the GF experiments at Chepstow were the previous weekend, although the irony of having diving cancelled due to excessively good weather would be something.

    Some computers know the current barometric pressure. I guess they compensate. Some certainly don’t. I am pretty certain my O2 analyser doesn’t. Maybe the fancy one does? Maybe it cancels out.

    Anyway, the point is models are models, some stuff isn’t known to the model, some more stuff might be known to the model but you can’t really be sure.
     
  2. JonG1

    JonG1 Barracuda

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    Location: Glossop UK
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    What was the study looking at Ken, would have liked to have volunteered but work got in way.
     
  3. Rollin

    Rollin Professional Photographer

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    Location: Belgium
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    Dr Neal Pollock did a interesting lecture for BSAC in 2016 in which he mentioned the relationship between atmospheric pressure and the occurence of DCS. The whole lecture is worth looking at by the way. Links starts at 13:48.

     

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