Regulator service advice for a beginner

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KingsSoldier08

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Hi. I am new to servicing diving gear. I came across a few older regulators and want to start servicing my own gear. I have what appears to be a scubapro 109, g250hp, g200 B, D400, Polar, Sherwood 3200, U.S. Divers Micra Adjustable, and Scubamax xr2002 2nd stages and Scubapro Mk2, Mk10, Mk15, Mk20, U.S divers costeau, and whatever was on the scubamax for first stages.

A few questions:
1. Which of these will make the best to learn something on and would make a good primary regulator?
2. Which has parts readily available that are reasonably priced? Some of these are listed at $40+, which seems steep for a few o-rings.
3. Other than Harlow's guide to regulator service and repair and annual service kits, what else do I need to start on these? I would like to use most, if not all, of these in the future to have gear that friends and family can use when they visit. Is this reasonable with the selection that I have?

I found service manuals for everything. I've heard many regs are identical inside as others. When looking for service kits, I assume they are interchangeable, but I don't know for sure what to get, and again, if I need other parts. Probably won't know until I take them apart?

I'm seeing great things about a lot of these regs, which is good. I'm leaning toward the 109/mk2 for the first one. It looks to be in good shape externally, so hopefully that carries over to internal condition. Plus I found videos of both being serviced.

Lube? I've read about lubrication. What do I need to get for that?

Thanks for any help

For reference, here are the links to my ID posts with pictures.
Gear find opinions/tips/identification
Old regulator identification
 

rhwestfall

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I'm a ScubaPro junkie, and IMHO you have a pretty good selection across that line of some great stuff they made.

The mk-2 is a very simple unbalanced first that is a workhorse. To get a little performance, I'd probably pair it with the g200b (balanced second). The 109 (unbalanced) can pair with the mk-10 nicely without messing with a 156 upgrade (though desirable). The g250hp and the d400 will pair nicely with the other firsts and give you some stellar performing regs.

There have been many discussions here on SB about those regulators.
 

herman

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I would also suggest you get a copy of "Regulator Savvy", it's more technical than Harlows book and between the 2, you get a really good understanding of how regs work.
I would start with the MK2 and the 109, not the highest performing reg but solid performers and easy the service.
You will get some debate on the lube but unless you are going to be using O2 higher than the standard 32 and 36 nitrox mixes I don't see the need for expensive lubes. Dow Corning Molycote 111 was the standard for years and a tube will last you a lifetime. I prefer it to the more expensive O2 safe lubes.
 

Scuba Client

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Read as many manuals as you can.
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A lot of technicians don't have the mechanical aptitude or appetite to be good at servicing regulators. I recently pulled apart a Scubapro MK25 without training, and successfully put it together the first time. When I connected it to my tank it went BOOM! Just kidding. IP tested perfect. Although the secret information I'm getting from 'Tinker of Brass' it would seem that having the right testing equipment would be the safest option. Just test IP every now and then, no IP creep, no noise, no free flow, no bulges, no problem.
 
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KingsSoldier08

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Read as many manuals as you can.
Shop

A lot of technicians don't have the mechanical aptitude or appetite to be good at servicing regulators. I recently pulled apart a Scubapro MK25 without training, and successfully put it together the first time. When I connected it to my tank it went BOOM! Just kidding. IP tested perfect. Although the secret information I'm getting from 'Tinker of Brass' it would seem that having the right testing equipment would be the safest option. Just test IP every now and then, no IP creep, no noise, no free flow, no bulges, no problem.
I do a lot of diy stuff with my boat and my vehicles and everything in my house. I'm one of those youtube diy guys. I have decent mechanical aptitude.
 

Scuba Client

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I do a lot of diy stuff with my boat and my vehicles and everything in my house. I'm one of those youtube diy guys. I have decent mechanical aptitude.
Then you shouldn't have a problem other than expanding your diving horizons.
 
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KingsSoldier08

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I would also suggest you get a copy of "Regulator Savvy", it's more technical than Harlows book and between the 2, you get a really good understanding of how regs work.
I would start with the MK2 and the 109, not the highest performing reg but solid performers and easy the service.
You will get some debate on the lube but unless you are going to be using O2 higher than the standard 32 and 36 nitrox mixes I don't see the need for expensive lubes. Dow Corning Molycote 111 was the standard for years and a tube will last you a lifetime. I prefer it to the more expensive O2 safe lubes.
Thanks for the tips. I would like to get into nitrox, but I haven't done that yet and doubt I'll go above the normal amount of oxygen.
 
https://www.shearwater.com/products/swift/

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