Rec or Tec?

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Josh the diver

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One your big points is the ability to adjust gradient factors. Most computers nowadays have that feature in them allowing the diver to be more or less conservative if they wish.

Price wise the perdix is comparable with other computers in the size, color screen, AI etc.

In short bad example. The only piece of gear I would consider tech only is a CCR, but I'm sure others will disagree with me on that point.
I disagree on CCR, I think a recreational photographer could benefit from a rebreather.
 

ginti

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Once you need gradient factors, trimix, or rebreather functionalities on your dive computer, though, you are well and truly in the realm of technical diving. That is something a recreational diver - by definition - would never need. For that kind of stuff, you need the training and certification that places you outside the limits of recreational diving.
First, let me clarify a point. Computers have algorithms inside; there are many algorithms, and some use gradient factors. In other words, many rec computers have gradient factors :)

Some other algorithms don't have GFs, and they are suitable for both tec and rec.

In other words, you always need an algorithm, and it doesn't matter whether you are a rec or a tec diver; the algorithms are the same.

The main difference is that in tec diving you may need to adjust some parameters... this yes increases risk massively if you don't know what you are doing.

I don't say it's not very nice and easy to operate. I'm just asking the question of whether features that one doesn't need - or worse - doesn't fully understand increase risk...

Now, I believe you refer to the other thread where a member asked for a new computer; I suggested the peregrine (or something cheap... but I don't like computers :) ). But the OP there was interested in a specific feature, air integration, plus some other characteristics, and you can only have all of them in tec computers.

Moving to your question: are these tools riskier for people who don't know how to use them? Well, only if these people start playing with the parameters; even in this case, within the limit of rec dives and assuming they don't dive solo, they would be limited by their buddies. So I would say they can create risks for people who do not fully understand these risks and dive solo. But if you dive solo, there are only two options:
- you have the proper training and experience, then you fully understand how to play and not to play with your toys;
- you don't have the proper training and experience, and in this case, the toys aren't going to kill you, but your insanity will!

So, in general, I do not see any risk here.
 
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Cheizz

Cheizz

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I disagree on CCR, I think a recreational photographer could benefit from a rebreather.
I am sure he could benefit from it. But being able to dive CCR, he would have the training and certification that would put him in the Tech zone, by the above definition. No?
 

sheeper

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Perdix....easy to use, easy to see. easy recreational nitrox mode.

Like a PC. You could be programming in C++ or you could just play Call of Duty.
 
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Cheizz

Cheizz

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@ginti I see your point. The difference is that in most recreational dive computers, those gradient factor settings are translated to human terminology (e.g. 'more conservative' or 'less conservative'). In the Perdix (and some others), you have to understand why 30/80 is the default and what it actually implies if you change one of them. There's a different level of understanding there, IMO.

I was triggered by that topic, that's true. It just got me thinking. There are some great suggestions in that topic that help out the OP but don't necessarily lead to the Perdix. Although I think that was the first one mentioned. Talk about 'default settings' haha...
 

ginti

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I am sure he could benefit from it. But being able to dive CCR, he would have the training and certification that would put him in the Tech zone, by the above definition. No?

I don't think so; these two links do not say a word of deco:

However, you should have a look at the standards to be sure...
 

ginti

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@ginti I see your point. The difference is that in most recreational dive computers, those gradient factor settings are translated to human terminology (e.g. 'more conservative' or 'less conservative'). In the Perdix (and some others), you have to understand why 30/80 is the default and what it actually implies if you change one of them. There's a different level of understanding there, IMO.

I am aware of that, but I do not see the risk. Buy it, and just ask your instructor how to set it more conservatively if you really need to; the instructor will provide you with the gradient factor to use to make the algorithm as conservative as a rec computer in "conservative diving" mode.

There is a risk if you start playing with something you do not know; but if you do it, it isn't the computer who is going to kill you, it's your insanity :)

Now, crazy people are always there, and even if they are crazy, we love them and we don't want them to have issues -> therefore extra caution is needed. But as soon as someone is aware of the risks, on my opinion everything is fine.
 

NorCalDM

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Besides - what man actually reeds the manual before jumping in (literally)? :wink:
I do! And for me I think the Shearwater computers are some of the easiest to set up and use so to me less risky. I and my wife have had many different computers over the years and her Teric is the only one she has set up without help.
 

Lorenzoid

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So why then recommend the Shearwater Perdix AI to a newly certified open water diver that just wants to dive tropical reefs in the Caribbean three weeks a year and do some freshwater quarry diving at home to keep his skills fresh? Don’t get me wrong. The Perdix is the ultimate dive computer at the moment, it is the benchmark to which every other dive computer is measured.

It is, however, also an expensive dive computer that has features that no recreational diver will ever use. I am not talking about the design, build quality, ergonomics, or attention to detail of the thing - that certainly is worth the extra buck. No doubt it looks cool on your wrist as well.

But is it wise to leave a piece of fully customizable gear in untrained hands? You can play around with decompression models, gradient factors, and other stuff that I personally don’t (yet) fully understand.
The rec-only diver is free to--perhaps even encouraged to--leave the Perdix in Rec Mode. The available customizations in Rec Mode are aligned with what a diver with a good OW-level education should know.

At least that is the response I would have given before Shearwater introduced the Peregrine. I see no reason to recommend the Perdix anymore to new divers who have no immediate goals beyond enjoying simple diving. The things you are "not talking about"--quality, customer service, etc.--are reasons to continue to recommend Shearwater products.
 
https://www.shearwater.com/products/peregrine/

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