Quarry Diving: 500 Dives in a Quarry - Are You SERIOUS???

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Drewski

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They say that there is no such thing as a silly question, but this proves "they" are wrong:



Here's big revelation for you Drewski: not everyone lives near the ocean.

Ah, well, I guess I didn't realize that. Did you happen to read my original post and what group of divers I was referring to?

Thanks...
 

Doc Harry

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Ah, well, I guess I didn't realize that. Did you happen to read my original post and what group of divers I was referring to?

Thanks...

Yes, I read your OP. And I just read it again to make sure I hadn't missed anything. The group of divers that you refer to are East coast quarry divers. Like me.

My response is unchanged: Not everyone lives near the ocean.

I think diving at 120 feet in 50 degree quarry water with 6 inches of visbility in total darkness has made me a much better diver.
 

Culcuhain

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I dive the Quarry because it is there.
I dive the ocean whenever fortune dictates.
I dive to dive.
:)
 

iztok

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Yes, I read your OP. And I just read it again to make sure I hadn't missed anything. The group of divers that you refer to are East coast quarry divers. Like me.

My response is unchanged: Not everyone lives near the ocean.

I think diving at 120 feet in 50 degree quarry water with 6 inches of visbility in total darkness has made me a much better diver.

Doc, where do you dive? Which quarry has 120ft?
 

iztok

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Iztok, Gilboa in Ohio goes to 135-140.

Jim, that is not in my area. I asked Doc Harry because he is in "Appalachian mountains" so I assumed he is somewhere close to me.
 

NewbaScuba

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Good question. Why would a person dive Lake Rawlings specifically 500 times?
PRO's: It is a good training spot, well set up to handle all of a person's training needs...well some of the needs anyway.
It's a good place to meet other folks, specifically trainers and fellow trainees, and most of the folks who are there every weekend are great personalities who look out for everyone there.
CON's: Holy crap it's expensive! I can book a flight to the carribean for less than a weekend of diving for my wife and I.
There are other options nearby. Guppy Gulch and Dutch Springs are two that come to mind. I have not even planned on a Dutch Springs trip, as it is even more absurdly expensive than LR. I have been harassing my wife into going to GG for a while, just have not solidified a date.

Back to your original question: why go to a quarry instead of the ocean...
Basically...Training, The only other reason I would go to a quarry is because a friend was going and invited me. I suppose another reason would be convenience of not having to load and tote a bunch of pre-filled.

I have noticed that most of the divers I know in the area are not aware of the local diving destinations. I mentioned diving Calvert Cliffs at my LDS and they looked at me confused. I asked about the Chesapeake bay, and nope, didn't know of anything there either.
My research on-line shows a plethora of options available. Most of those come with the detractor of a heavy spear fishing population, Crabbers, clam hunters and the like. Wrecks seem hugely popular here.

Some other options off the top of my head:
Calvert Cliffs
Chesapeake Bay - there are about 20 sites available
Fort Carroll
Ocean City
Virginia Beach
 

Drewski

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Yes, I read your OP. And I just read it again to make sure I hadn't missed anything. The group of divers that you refer to are East coast quarry divers. Like me. My response is unchanged: Not everyone lives near the ocean.

OK, here's what I said:

Perplexing, given that millions of these people live only a short drive from an ocean with outstanding opportunity. Some folks actually drive further to dive a quarry, than a shorter ride to a boat dock.

And later:

OK, when I posted this, I was thinking about folks who live on the east coast, generally within about 100 miles of the ocean. Needless to say, if you live in Oklahoma, ocean diving is a major investment for you. Obviously, it's more than just a weekend jaunt and that wasn't what I was thinking of. By all means, if I lived in the central United States, I'd dive quarries all the time too.

The divers I'm referring to often live on the coast (I mean nearer to the ocean than a quarry), so it's a longer drive to the quarry than the boat dock. What I was having difficulty understanding was why these folks almost NEVER dive the ocean. From what's been posted here, cost and convenience (i.e., weather, availability, sea sickness, etc.) seem to be the big factors. I'll also bet - although only a few said this - that most of these people did all their certification dives in quarries. You often dive where you train.

I think diving at 120 feet in 50 degree quarry water with 6 inches of visbility in total darkness has made me a much better diver.

And it may have, no argument. But, I've seen those exact conditions offshore - in fact, even better conditions - and watched divers with only confined water experience really have issues. Personally, if I was diving the ocean with only 6 inches of visibility, I'd probably stop. Add 120 FT and 50 degree water to that and I'd be headed to the quarry too! Oh, wait... well, never mind. :D

Seriously, though, all I'm saying is what would it take to translate the enthusiasm people have for quarries to the ocean setting? I think I got some answers in this thread and that's what I was looking for.

Thanks again...

Andy
 

Davemohio

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I agree with Newbascuba that many divers have NO idea what is available to dive locally. They give you the look like "you dive where?" Is that in Ohio?

They will say "is that safe" or "is that legal?"

My response is: these quarries/sites are made for scuba ONLY(usually).
 

Drewski

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Why would a person dive Lake Rawlings specifically 500 times? PRO's: It is a good training spot, well set up to handle all of a person's training needs...

It's a good place to meet other folks, specifically trainers and fellow trainees...

Back to your original question: why go to a quarry instead of the ocean... Basically...Training

OK, I'm curious. From your profile, it seems you are a new diver. So here are my questions to you:

  1. Did the instructor or shop you trained with do all of your training in a quarry?
  2. If you took Advanced Open Water, did they do all the dives in quarries?
  3. You indicate you live in Virginia (me too). Did the instructor or shop ever mention ocean dives as an option?
  4. What do you think the ultimate purpose is of the training you received? Prepare you for ocean diving, make you a "better" diver (to what end?), or "sell" you more training to keep you diving?

Dive shops work if (1) they get people interested in diving, (2) move students through Open Water to Advanced Open Water and specialties, (3) sell them gear and, (4) keep them diving. It's a simple equation but if you lose one of these legs, the chair will fail.

The shift I've seen in the last 20 years is a concentration on quarry diving because it's easier and cheaper. A dive shop owner less than 5 miles from some great offshore diving recently told me that they do all their student dives in the quarry. He makes $50 a student a day, plus the gear sales. So, while his students and junior instructors are at the quarry, he's spearing fish on a private boat with his buddies offshore. That certainly works from the business perspective, at least short term, but GEEZE, I couldn't do that...

Another shop committed to a full size boat, along with running at least 4 days a week. They also run a dive club that gives you half off on weekday boat trips. They recently started to shift at least one day of certification dives to the boat. Although the season started out difficult for them, they now have a full boat each weekend and many weekdays and seem to be really attracting new business and returning business. Sure, the boat's crowded, but it's running and people keep coming back.

THANKS...
 
https://www.shearwater.com/products/teric/

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