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First Rebreather

Discussion in 'Rebreather Diving' started by TecDiver1990, Mar 17, 2012.

Which Rebreather is the BEST First Rebreather?

  1. ISC Megalodon APECS 2.7/Predator w/ 8 lb. Scrubber

    8 vote(s)
    33.3%
  2. reVo III w/ Large Radial Scrubber

    15 vote(s)
    62.5%
  3. Sentinel Expedition

    1 vote(s)
    4.2%
  1. TecDiver1990

    TecDiver1990 Contributor

    # of Dives:
    Location: Atlanta, Georgia
    143
    16
    After talking with Jim Wyatt and a few other people, I've pretty much decided on the rEvo III standard with dual radial scrubbers, Titan Manual Addition Block, 5-cell: rEvodream (Primary), Shearwater Predator w/ Fischer Cable (Secondary), Cooper Hose Upgrade, Heavy 3L Tanks w/ valves, and HUD. I'll be mounting mine on my Hollis SMS 100 that I use for SM OC right now, so I can sling my bailout trim like SM tanks.

    As to getting into the types of dives that I want to eventually do, that wont be until I've gotten CCR, CCR Cave, and CCR Trimix; and have ~50 total logged hours before I do CCR Cave, ~200 total logged hours before I do CCR Trimix, and ~500 total logged hours before I do any deep cave dives over 200fsw like Eagle's Nest, Alachua, Blue, Buford, Cathedral, Diepolder, or places like that.

    I know it's going to take time. I'm along for the ride, in it for the long haul, and just glad that I'm going to be able to make the journey.
     
  2. Wayne at DiveSeekers

    Wayne at DiveSeekers Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: New Jersey
    863
    170
    Sounds like you are getting squared away, i have seen divers use a Nomad so the Hollis will definitely work and we side mount our bailout as well. Welcome to the Bubble Free World, enjoy your journey!
     
  3. ScubaAl

    ScubaAl ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    300
    34
    Not on your list, but I have been diving a Inspiration Vision. This will be my 5th season with it, to date not a single problem. Most dives in the 200ft+ range and cold water. Picked mine up used for a fair price and haven't looked back (at OC).
    Just returned from my second trip this winter to Florida caves. Dove JB, Little River, and Peacock. Skipped Eagles nest this trip but did dive it back in Dec.

    Al
     
  4. Thalassamania

    Thalassamania Diving Polymath ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: On a large pile of smokin' A'a, the most isolated
    22,171
    2,774
    I agree with what Wayne says about procedures, but I have to add that I think the greatest hazard for a rebreather diver is not in the first 30 hours, when all is new and the diver is highly attentive to flying the rig, it is when the diver starts to get comfortable, confident and complacent. Combine that with some time off the unit as a result of illness or work pressures or whatever and then you've got a recipe for disaster.
     
  5. TecDiver1990

    TecDiver1990 Contributor

    # of Dives:
    Location: Atlanta, Georgia
    143
    16
    Thanks, Wayne! I appreciate all the advice!
     
  6. TecDiver1990

    TecDiver1990 Contributor

    # of Dives:
    Location: Atlanta, Georgia
    143
    16
    I've seen them, and a friend of mine dives the Inspiration. How does it travel on aircraft? How does it stack up weight-wise compared to the rEvo or Meg?
     
  7. TecDiver1990

    TecDiver1990 Contributor

    # of Dives:
    Location: Atlanta, Georgia
    143
    16
    Diving a rebreather sounds alot like flying a light aircraft: If you get complacent and quit paying attention for just a second, or you're out of practice and you start trying to be the Great Santini, it can just kill you outright.
     
    Thalassamania likes this.
  8. swadiver

    swadiver Registered

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: SE Florida
    32
    0
    Good choice on the Revo III. i am biased, cause thats what i dive. you may want to reconsider on the Titan manual add block. it's fine except it is made out of aluminum and requires much more maintainence to prevent corrosion from freezing in the fittings. even if you don't do much saltwater diving, it can be an issue. my wife's corroded in less than a year despite the maintainence. i would go with the delrin constructed manual add block from Silent Scuba. it is a little larger and heavier, and a few bucks more, but does not suffer from the corrosion issues. that's what all of us wreck and cave divers down here in south Florida have gone with, including my wife.

    have fun in class and you will love the Revo.

    just a side note, i saw you considered the Sentinel. i personally think you are wise to stay away from it for the diving you are contemplating. it is a beautiful, but IMHO, over engineered piece of kit. with this come, complexity and reliability issues. the Revo is capable of handling just about any of the dives you can imagine.
     
  9. TecDiver1990

    TecDiver1990 Contributor

    # of Dives:
    Location: Atlanta, Georgia
    143
    16
    Thanks for the advice on that Titan MAB, It's what comes with it when you get it from Jim at Cave Country Dive Shop. I'll definately make a note about that and keep an eye on it, but all I really do is caves and quarrys anymore. I think it's been almost 3 years since I've been in saltwater. Either way, I'll upgrade it after a while, once the rebreather is paid off. I can't wait to get my rEvo! Thanks again!
     
  10. jlovold

    jlovold Contributor

    # of Dives:
    Location: Sandnes Norway
    148
    6
    Why not rEvo with rMS?
    It should be able to give you more than six hours scrubberlife (especially in warm waters), and you´ll even get to know when you are getting close to the limit...
     

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