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Fire on dive boat Conception in CA

Discussion in 'Accidents and Incidents' started by divezonescuba, Sep 2, 2019.

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  1. tarponchik

    tarponchik Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: USA
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    Right, but you need lots of fuel for the furnace. Where did it come from?
     
  2. KevinNM

    KevinNM DIR Practitioner

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    This is an example:
    The cushions of the benches. Peak Heat Release Rate of polyurethane foam averages 200 kW in the first phase when the TDI burns. Then the Polyol ignites. It produces over a megawatt of heat, with 14 foot high 1500 degree flames.

    And then everything else in the room flashes over and the wood and structural fiberglass and everything else ignites.
     
    Akimbo likes this.
  3. Eric Sedletzky

    Eric Sedletzky Great White

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Santa Rosa, CA
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    We can start with all the synthetic materials of all the boat coats hanging in the gangway to the salon right by the counters where everybody charges their devices and strobe batteries.
     
    shoredivr likes this.
  4. tarponchik

    tarponchik Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: USA
    1,698
    370
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    I've noted the cushions in my previous comment, but it's not enough. It could have killed the divers by generating toxic fumes (polyurethane produces HCN when it burns) but the sheer volume of it is not enough to make a catastrophic fire. The way you described it this boat was built as a disaster waiting to happen, like a floating fireworks storage--how come they survived for 40 years?
     
  5. KevinNM

    KevinNM DIR Practitioner

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    Cocoanut Grove had opened in 1927 it was very popular night club, the premiere club in Boston, with no problems. Until November 28. 1942 when it burned down, killing 492 people. This was 10 days after a fire inspection had declared it safe.

    The Beverly Hills Supper Club had been operating at the same location under various names since 1926 with no significant issues. Until the night of May 28, 1977 when it burned down, killing 165.

    Both had been pretty much in the same condition for years, but had never had a bad day. Until one day they did.

    Edit to fix name
     
    Esprise Me, Akimbo, shoredivr and 2 others like this.
  6. BettyRubble

    BettyRubble Orca

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Delaware
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    My thoughts are with the families, crew, rescuers, and investigators. Heart breaking.

    As the industry works to identify and implement safety enhancements, we as individual divers need to consider what we can do differently today.

    Assuming batteries were a direct cause (speculation) how many of us are willing to leave our phones, computers, video/camera, and other equipment batteries on shore?

    What individual limits and sacrifices are we willing to commit to in order to contribute to a safer experience for all?

    We can’t leave it entirely up to the boat owners/operators, regulators, and inspectors. We can each contribute meaningfully to the solution.
     
  7. KevinNM

    KevinNM DIR Practitioner

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    The foam used for the tests was 4 inches thick and 4ft bx 4ft. Based on the video I saw you'd have had at the equivalent for least two of those in the salon. This assumes those are polyurethane foam, which is very common.
     
  8. drrich2

    drrich2 Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Southwestern Kentucky
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    No. Ain't happening. For the money trips cost, the time and general personal investment, and the great value the photos (and for some videos) we bring home have for us, no, we're not leaving our cameras home, and people often use their computers for graphics work or just to enjoy. Some people may read books on their phones, tablets or e-readers.

    You could probably get people to charge their devices in some sort of contained compartment (e.g.: maybe like a metal trunk with internal outlets) to cut down risk during charging.

    Richard.
     
    Esprise Me, eleniel, Tesibria and 5 others like this.
  9. EricTheDood

    EricTheDood DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: California
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    As some others pointed out earlier, fireproof LiPo charging bags - apparently popular with the R/C crowd. $15 bucks on Amazon. A no-brainer assuming they work.

    Edit to add: but yes, the metal trunk idea is the best way to go for the boat owner.
     
    Esprise Me, Gdog, eleniel and 5 others like this.
  10. Bob DBF

    Bob DBF Solo Diver

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: NorCal
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    Fiberglas boats are a disaster waiting to happen, but like diving it is a matter of mitigating the dangers. Kind of like driving the highways, only you can't get out and walk away.

    In a Coast Guard Aux. class, fighting a fire on a pleasure craft was discussed. Having fire extinguishers, knowing how to use them and being vigilant on preventing fires and detecting them early, and calling for help immediatly, would prevent or extinguish any fire early and get help on the way. The most important rule, they said, was once you see fiberglass structure burning, abandon ship and swim away from the smoke. You can no longer fight the fire and win, and the smoke will kill you.

    As far as starting the Fiberglas structure, the fibergass bulkhead was the back of the charging station, as I remember. Between the batteries themselves, boat coats, and seat cushions, and probably the cabinet top, all in that small area, the bulkhead could get hot enough to ignite.


    Bob
     
    uwxplorer, Akimbo, Luis H and 3 others like this.
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