Carbon Monoxide tank testers

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OTF

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How about using one tougher reusable bag (like a drybag) instead of trashing so many flimsy ziplocks?

I really should start testing for CO.
 
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DandyDon

DandyDon

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How about using one tougher reusable bag (like a drybag) instead of trashing so many flimsy ziplocks?
If you can get the air out ok and use it the same, sure. Or maybe buy better quality ziplocks than I do.
 

dsvs

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If all tanks on a boat were filled at the same place at the same time, presumably it's reasonable to test one tank rather than every one? Seems unlikely that a compressor would contaminate some tanks and not others, or am I missing something here?
 
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DandyDon

DandyDon

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If all tanks on a boat were filled at the same place at the same time, presumably it's reasonable to test one tank rather than every one? Seems unlikely that a compressor would contaminate some tanks and not others, or am I missing something here?
No, that's a common misunderstanding. Tanks filled with a compressor can vary as it runs, heats up, filters change, etc. It'd be safer if they were all filled from the same bank while it was not being refilled, but even that is no guarantee.
 

marc.collin

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I use my Sensorcon to monitor my compressor output on fills (continuous), and for household and activity monitoring (working in areas or doing activities that produce CO)... Been very happy with mine.

I actually have the original plumbing kit from the old SCUBA testing kit they sold back in the day. It was a model for plumbing my compressor.

Oh, and they are made here where I live!
Sensorcon detector is not expensive but i found nothing to connect to diving cylinder
 

rhwestfall

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Sensorcon detector is not expensive but i found nothing to connect to diving cylinder

DIN to yoke adapter (if yoke), DIN delrin plug, threaded/ barbed tubing adapter, tubing, tee, spring ball check valve, flow valve....

Drill the DIN cap and thread in barbed tubing adapter. Tubing to the tee. One leg of tee has check valve allowing excess pressure to vent. Other leg goes to a limiting valve, then to the detector..

Done...
 
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DandyDon

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Sensorcon detector is not expensive but i found nothing to connect to diving cylinder
One gallon ziplock bags with easy closing.
 

rhwestfall

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Just barely crack the tank valve or things go to pieces...

My more expensive solution is the Oxycheq DIN flow reducer...

You probably could figure out some other feed like a bcd lp flow reducer, and feed off a first stage on the tank through a l.p. port.
 
https://www.shearwater.com/products/peregrine/

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