Another Great White at Monterey

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TrojanCatMan

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JDog:
.......Some fish they have to hand feed just to keep them alive. .....

I think this is an incorrect statement.

In order to display a good variety of fish in an exibit. One must often times keep several speicies in closer proximity to one another than in the wild. Fishes as well as humans have several levels of agression or dominance in their enviroment. Therefore if you were to just chuck a bucket of food in your exibit, only the most aggresive fishes would eat, that is why you must "target" feed some species at the aquarium. You could learn a lot more about how these Aquariums work by visiting, in your case the Long Beach Aquarium of the Pacific. There are hundreds of unpaid volunteers working there that would be happy to answer any of your questions.

Actually you did agree to my statement. You just confirmed ONE reason why the target feed.
 

JDog

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TrojanCatMan:
Did I say they killed the last one? No, they let it into the wild. Don't put words in my mouth...............


I don't think Tankboygreg put anything in your mouth..........:censored:.
 

TrojanCatMan

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No need to be rude, it only weakens your argument. I am suggesting evaluating the ethical implications of having such an animal in captivity. We have a responsibility to any animals we keep in captivity.
 

niuhi

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I got to see the great white yesterday!! I was on a trip up to San Fran from OC to do the Alcatraz swim (finished in 58 minutes!!) and stoped by Monterey on the way home, and to my surprize they had a great white. Im a diver at the Aquarium of the Pacific and worked on a research cruise with Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute this summer so I got a little inside perspective of what they are doing for white shark research. Attendance did go up 400% last time they had a GW but they let it go for the well being of the shark and the other inhabitants of the aquarium, the respectable thing to do. When SeaWorld started killing Orcas they claimed that their lifespan was only a few years where they are more like human lifespans, revenue vs research. One of the major hurdles was creating an enivironment big enough and without any electrical devices that would interfere with their electrical feild. It was my first time at Monterey Bay Aq and I am now jealous of their operation, Aq of Pacific is nice but monterey offers a bit more.

Most of the Tuna in that aquarium dwarf the baby shark. I would rather dive with the great white than some of those tuna.
 

archman

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niuhi:
When SeaWorld started killing Orcas they claimed that their lifespan was only a few years where they are more like human lifespans, revenue vs research.

Whoa, back up. Could you discuss this further? Just how old do these things actually live? Where'd you hear about this from?
 

niuhi

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archman:
Whoa, back up. Could you discuss this further? Just how old do these things actually live? Where'd you hear about this from?

I cant call myself an expert on orcas but my professor is and thats where I heard it first. He said that they will never tell you that the orcas lifespan is reduced considerably by living in captivity. Why do you think that they keep on replenishing the "Shamus". People still think that its the origional Orca.

I love google. Search Orca lifespan and you get all kindsa info. Heres a great link to whale and dolphin concervancy center it has all the info you should ever need.

The point of my argument is Revenue vs Research. Monterey is well know for the research they fund and contribute to. Their pacific pelagics tagging program is very interesting, check it out if ya got nothing to do.
 

archman

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niuhi:
I love google. Search Orca lifespan and you get all kindsa info. Heres a great link to whale and dolphin concervancy center it has all the info you should ever need.
That's an NGO source, and a biased one at that. You have to be careful when using such references. This one gives misleading information here:
Once in captivity, an orca's lifespan is drastically reduced to an average of only 5 or 6 years

Which I believe actually is in reference to years held in captivity, not the actual age of the animal. I think most orcas live well up into their 20's in captivity, which is roughly about half their expected lifespan in the wild. Which isn't so bad for captively held marine organisms, especially really big ones. I'd be really interested in seeing how long the Atlanta aquarium can keep its whale shark(s) alive.
 

niuhi

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I just googled it to see what I would come up with. It does seem ab it exeagerated and dated, but it took alot of orca deaths to advance the husbandry procedures so that they can live longer now. m really curious to how the whale sharks will live, them being plankton consumers. A dive buddy of mine got to dive with them in the aquarium but I don't have any good info on them.
 
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