4 Months in Prison for Breaking Quarantine in Cayman Islands

Please register or login

Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

Benefits of registering include

  • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
  • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
  • You can make this box go away

Joining is quick and easy. Log in or Register now!

Jafo19D

Contributor
Messages
357
Reaction score
270
Location
Colombia
# of dives
50 - 99
If more people had followed the advice of health professionals the daily death count would not be so horrific. Sadly, many seem to place a higher value on personal entitlement than civic responsibility. Good on the Cayman Islands for taking a tough stand.
Yep, screw anyone who puts others at risk
 

scubadada

Diver
Staff member
ScubaBoard Supporter
Messages
15,109
Reaction score
11,986
Location
Philadelphia and Boynton Beach
# of dives
1000 - 2499
Skylar applies to medical school
INTERVIEWER: What is this gap in your CV at the end of 2020 and beginning of 2021?
SKYLAR: Well, I was in prison on Grand Cayman for violating Covid-19 quarantine, so that I could go see my boyfriend in a professional jet ski competition.
INTERVIEWER: Really?
 

jonhall

Contributor
Messages
1,364
Reaction score
774
Location
Indianapolis
# of dives
100 - 199
If I misinterpret what I've read about travel to CI, please feel free to correct.

Currently a traveler has to fit in one of a group of categories to be able to travel to CI. I'm guessing that Mack could travel there because she or her family (more likely) owns residential property, or she has close ties to a resident (not sure boyfriend fits here.)

She would have had a PCR test at the airport upon arrival with a 72 hour window for results. A second test would have been given after the 14 day quarantine. I bring this up because Mack, according to reports broke quarantine only 2 days (~48 hrs) into the quarantine, but many people are saying she had tested negative twice - family member says before she left for CI and when she arrived. I don't see this as a defense in this situation.

Assuming she was not in a government quarantine facility, she had to wear the wrist monitor for 14 days, but chose to, with the help of her boyfriend after only 2 days of quarantine, remove it. Was her dad, a competitive jet skier, there for the competition and whether he was or not, shouldn't he have given her some fatherly advice? Wouldn't the boyfriend have told her about the Canadian couple who earlier breached quarantine (and paid a fine and aren't allowed to return until COVID regulations ease) and CI's laws about breaching a quarantine.

I think it's obvious what the plan was once she arrived. Had she not been caught on day 2, would she have continued to breach quarantine? (And had she, how would people have felt then, no matter her age?)

As to her sentence, was it too harsh, too lenient, or just right? The only thing I would be concerned with is what @scubadada refers to - that being a part of one's record at such a young age - but I don't know what level or class of crime it is considered in CI and if that is something one would have to put on any type of application here in the U.S. I would be against her sentence having an effect on her rights in the U.S. Does one's character and record in the U.S. have any bearing on a case in another country? I also wonder if the offense had been committed by a 45 year old, would people have the same feelings about the case? It is what it is, but with the lawyer appealing and the social media what it is, I'd be surprised if the sentence wasn't reduced.

As an older person, I think most of us who travel tend to research where we go. We assume any risks associated with that travel. During these Covid times, circumstances dictate different measures - I have no problem with what a country or an island does - I know I can make my own choice, right or wrong - I just need to live with my choice. We take 2 week trips but there is no way I'm going to CI as long as there is a 14 day quarantine in place even if I were lucky enough to own a residence there - now if you were to give me a house on CI, I would force myself to stay inside, outside, or whatever it takes for 14 days!!!!
 

Joneill

ScubaBoard Supporter
ScubaBoard Supporter
Messages
2,052
Reaction score
2,039
Location
New Jersey, USA
# of dives
100 - 199
If I misinterpret what I've read about travel to CI, please feel free to correct.

Currently a traveler has to fit in one of a group of categories to be able to travel to CI. I'm guessing that Mack could travel there because she or her family (more likely) owns residential property, or she has close ties to a resident (not sure boyfriend fits here.)

She would have had a PCR test at the airport upon arrival with a 72 hour window for results. A second test would have been given after the 14 day quarantine. I bring this up because Mack, according to reports broke quarantine only 2 days (~48 hrs) into the quarantine, but many people are saying she had tested negative twice - family member says before she left for CI and when she arrived. I don't see this as a defense in this situation.

Assuming she was not in a government quarantine facility, she had to wear the wrist monitor for 14 days, but chose to, with the help of her boyfriend after only 2 days of quarantine, remove it. Was her dad, a competitive jet skier, there for the competition and whether he was or not, shouldn't he have given her some fatherly advice? Wouldn't the boyfriend have told her about the Canadian couple who earlier breached quarantine (and paid a fine and aren't allowed to return until COVID regulations ease) and CI's laws about breaching a quarantine.

I think it's obvious what the plan was once she arrived. Had she not been caught on day 2, would she have continued to breach quarantine? (And had she, how would people have felt then, no matter her age?)

As to her sentence, was it too harsh, too lenient, or just right? The only thing I would be concerned with is what @scubadada refers to - that being a part of one's record at such a young age - but I don't know what level or class of crime it is considered in CI and if that is something one would have to put on any type of application here in the U.S. I would be against her sentence having an effect on her rights in the U.S. Does one's character and record in the U.S. have any bearing on a case in another country? I also wonder if the offense had been committed by a 45 year old, would people have the same feelings about the case? It is what it is, but with the lawyer appealing and the social media what it is, I'd be surprised if the sentence wasn't reduced.

As an older person, I think most of us who travel tend to research where we go. We assume any risks associated with that travel. During these Covid times, circumstances dictate different measures - I have no problem with what a country or an island does - I know I can make my own choice, right or wrong - I just need to live with my choice. We take 2 week trips but there is no way I'm going to CI as long as there is a 14 day quarantine in place even if I were lucky enough to own a residence there - now if you were to give me a house on CI, I would force myself to stay inside, outside, or whatever it takes for 14 days!!!!
Given the premeditated nature of the offense and Cayman’s well publicized policy for foreigners breaking mandatory quarantine of up to $10K (CI) and 2 years in prison - she should just STFU and deal with the consequences of her actions.

Oh wait... these days no one wants to take personal responsibility and figures a quick apology makes everything all better... especially if they are “younger”. I’m sick of that attitude and, unfortunately, it won’t change until folks realize they will be held accountable and will pay the price!
 

scubadada

Diver
Staff member
ScubaBoard Supporter
Messages
15,109
Reaction score
11,986
Location
Philadelphia and Boynton Beach
# of dives
1000 - 2499
Yes, I also wonder what her father, another professional jet ski competitor, must have been thinking when Skylar showed up at the competition, just two days after her arrival. The reporting on this transgression has not been perfectly complete, or transparent.

Would any of you have violated the quarantine protocol to go diving? The possible penalties are quite clear. I think not, I wouldn't.
 

Rickk

Contributor
Messages
306
Reaction score
322
Location
Philippines
# of dives
200 - 499
I have absolutely zero sympathy for any foreigner in any country that gets tossed in prison for doing something that is against local law.

Whatever is legal at home, whatever rights you have at home simply do not matter at all. All your embassy will do is ensure that you are treated in accordance with local laws, they will not do much to get you out of trouble, out of jail or out of the country. ( and for what it is worth, the local embassy staff that do this duty are the lowest level foreign service employees and it is the least desirable task in the embassy.)

All that matters is that something is illegal where you are and what rights you have where you are.

Break the local laws, do the local punishments. Quit complaining.
 
https://www.shearwater.com/products/peregrine/

Top Bottom