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Reported DCS on plane

Discussion in 'Near Misses and Lessons Learned' started by chillyinCanada, Jul 2, 2019.

  1. chillyinCanada

    chillyinCanada Solo Diver Staff Member

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  2. Rollin Bonz

    Rollin Bonz Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Georgia, the state, not the country ;-)
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    Something seems amiss...
    I know DCS is highly unpredictable, but 19 hours since diving, only 3 dives and only to 30 feet?
    I'm curious as to his diving experience.
     
  3. bperrybap

    bperrybap Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Dallas, Tx
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    So according to this report, a diver did 3 dives between 15 and 30 ft in Cancun, and took a flight home 19 hours later.
    He reportedly got DCS on the flight. Is that even possible?
    Plane Makes Emergency Landing In Dallas When Scuba Diver Suffers Decompression Sickness

    Can you really build up and retain enough nitrogen to get DCS on a flight after just 3 dives to a maximum of only 30ft and a 19hr SIT time? even if dehydrated?

    --- bill
     
  4. bperrybap

    bperrybap Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Dallas, Tx
    528
    18
    18
    Maybe he was so worried about getting DCS that he had an anxiety attack.
    That could cause hyperventilating/breathing issues, and tingling in extremities.
    --- bill
     
  5. wnissen

    wnissen Barracuda

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Livermore, Calif.
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    That's hard to imagine. Typical cabin pressure is equivalent to 6000-8000 ft (1800-2400 m). If you did those dives at 8000 ft (the worst case), 30 ft (10m) turns into 40 ft. Using that depth, three hourlong dives to 40 ft, with minimal 30 minute surface intervals, would put you in pressure group X, right about at the NDL for 40 ft. But that's the worst case. Even if none of the dives were shallower, or shorter, or had longer surface intervals, you'd think the 19 hours would have been enough to protect him.
     
  6. rjack321

    rjack321 Captain

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Port Orchard, WA
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    hypochondria is real too
     
    Dan, NAUI Wowie, Barnaby'sDad and 5 others like this.
  7. digdug87

    digdug87 Divemaster

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Carthage, MO, USA
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    From one news article that I read, it stated that he was dehydrated, and had been work out prior to take off.
     
  8. JackD342

    JackD342 Dive Shop

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Highland Park, IL
    2,438
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    Also could be some added factors not listed. Alcohol consumption? Hot tub? Etc.
     
  9. yle

    yle Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Southern California
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    From the article linked above, a quote from the "victim":

    “We were only about 20 minutes into the flight when my hands started tingling. I felt nauseous, dizzy and had trouble breathing,” said Altoos, 26. “I told the flight attendant I need oxygen right away. I think I have decompression sickness.”

    Both hands tingling!! Nausea, trouble breathing! Wow... sounds very serious.

    So they had to make an "emergency landing" in Dallas. But Cancun to Dallas is 3 hours. So if he experienced these symptoms 20 minutes into the flight, it was several more hours (while flying at altitude) before he could get to a hospital.

    But at least he was able to self-diagnose the DCS. Very likely he'll have recurring symptoms for the rest of his life, might not ever go on another DSD again.
     
    Seaweed Doc likes this.
  10. yle

    yle Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Southern California
    1,101
    910
    113
    Reading between the lines, I would be willing to bet that his total diving experience is what you just described. That is, he went on three DSDs during his stay.
     
    Rollin Bonz likes this.

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