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Removing salt and chlorine from water

Discussion in 'Do It Yourself - DIY' started by formernuke, Dec 7, 2019.

  1. formernuke

    formernuke Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: New England
    603
    327
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    I'm thinking of making a DIY rinse station for my gear as I have a lot of stuff I need already. The plan is to use a sump in the basement pump the water up to first floor rinse the gear and have it gravity drain back to the sump thereby reusing the water and wasting less.

    What I'm wondering is how to then get the chlorine and salt from the rinse out of the sump. Will a under the sink two stage filter do it or do I need to run it through a RO unit (which does waste some of it.
     
  2. Jonn

    Jonn Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Alberta
    115
    60
    28
    Do you live in the Sahara desert, or on a tiny rocky island or something? Running RO or a distillation column or something to recycle your rinse water seems crazy if you’re hooked up to city pipes. It’s not that scarce a resource even in Johannesburg! Just toss your gear in the bathtub and use a shower nozzle on a hose.
     
  3. formernuke

    formernuke Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: New England
    603
    327
    63
    I have to pay for the water and I'm a cheap bastard.

    Right now I rinse in the shower but hauling those steel tanks up and down the stairs is hell on my knee and back (both injured)
     
  4. davehicks

    davehicks Barracuda

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Seattle
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    261
    63
    Maybe don't rinse the tanks? I suggest that most tanks never get washed and manage to stay in service for many years. Or wait for a rainy day?
     
  5. Bob DBF

    Bob DBF Solo Diver

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: NorCal
    6,700
    7,090
    113
  6. Jonn

    Jonn Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Alberta
    115
    60
    28
    I don’t ever rinse my tanks or weights. They’re fairly indestructible. The price of city water would have to be very high indeed for a system like that to pay off within its lifetime. If you want to do it just because as a hobby though, more power to ya!
     
  7. formernuke

    formernuke Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: New England
    603
    327
    63
    If I have to use a RO or still I won't do it, if I can use a 2 stage filter it's worth doing.
     
  8. tridacna

    tridacna ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: New Jersey
    5,822
    2,871
    113
    Install a desalination plant on your second floor. The electricity generated should help cover ongoing costs.
     
    Dark Wolf likes this.
  9. Bob DBF

    Bob DBF Solo Diver

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: NorCal
    6,700
    7,090
    113
    Problem with filters is that the water molecules are larger than the salt ions.

    Scientists are working on a filter that captures the ions, but you may have to wait ‘till they work out the bugs.

    Still may cost more than your water bill.

    EDIT:
    Noticed you are in New England, capture rainwater and just do single use, you may need a bit more storage. It isn’t like out here where it is normally dry at least a half a year at a time.


    Bob
     
    Midwesterndvr and tridacna like this.
  10. BenjaminF

    BenjaminF Photographer

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Israel
    394
    161
    43
    You may want to recheck your point of reference for water availability :p Even Capetown is now suffering from restrictions.
     

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