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Quit rustling our horses! Grrr

Discussion in 'Underwater Treasures' started by chillyinCanada, Dec 28, 2019.

  1. chillyinCanada

    chillyinCanada Solo Diver Staff Member

    19,142
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  2. lowviz

    lowviz Solo Diver ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Northern Delaware or the New Jersey Turnpike
    6,849
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    I find them to be quite cool little critters. You light up their life in the middle of the night and they start to feed. I've spent many more than one tank just watching one of them. Fascinating.

    You would need to ask an expert how they get here (Northeast USA) and if they last the winter. ( @agilis )

    Yellow Seahorse.jpg
     
  3. Blueringocto_73

    Blueringocto_73 Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: NorCal
    4,303
    6,039
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    They are fascinating creatures. And look kind of intelligent the way their eyes study their environment. Truly sickening.

    An excerpt:
    "A clear picture has emerged about the curative activities of seahorses because researchers have found out that, in addition to their traditional use in treating erectile dysfunction [6], [9], seahorses also exhibit antitumor, antiaging, and antifatigue properties and are able to suppress neuroinflammatory responses and collagen release [8], [10]. The two-millennium history of TCM guarantees a great demand for seahorses among Chinese people, and dried seahorses are mainly consumed in China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan [7]. The economic development of China, which has increased the demands for TCM, has been catastrophic for wild animals [11]. It is thus predicted that seahorses will face increasingly deleterious conditions in the future."

    Even though fishery by-catch, especially from shrimp trawlers, is the principal method of seahorse capture [12], economic enticement has caused an increasing number of fishermen to employ fishing methods that specifically target seahorses in many developing nations, such as Brazil, India, and the Philippines [7]. Fishing has had drastic effects on many aspects of seahorses, such as harming individuals, destroying social structure, reducing reproduction, affecting population structure, and devastating habitats [13]; unfortunately, many of their life history traits, such as high mate fidelity, small brood sizes, lengthy parental care, and low dispersal ability, make them more susceptible to persistent exploitation


     
    chillyinCanada likes this.
  4. Snoweman

    Snoweman Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Atlanta, GA
    1,811
    818
    113
    Wow. I didn't know there were that many in the ocean.
     
    kelemvor and Blueringocto_73 like this.
  5. Catito

    Catito Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Palm Beach County, Fl
    77
    47
    18
    Oh this is terrible. At Blue Heron Bridge I have seen ONE...12.3 million to be ground up and taken for viagra-like treatments???? Ugh
     
    Blueringocto_73 likes this.
  6. agilis

    agilis Solo Diver

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: N.J.
    9,054
    11,046
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  7. Saboteur

    Saboteur Regular of the Pub

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Earth
    491
    488
    63
    Another species decimated by Chinese in the name of mythical medicinal uses or dubious benefits.
     
  8. Catito

    Catito Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Palm Beach County, Fl
    77
    47
    18
    Blueringocto_73 likes this.
  9. Catito

    Catito Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Palm Beach County, Fl
    77
    47
    18
    Yesterday (December 29) I was diving under the Blue Heron Bridge,Riviera Beach, Florida. I came across a diver (at the bottom) with a small aquarium net. I stared at her—but the current swept me past her. She was wearing a wetsuit with “Sea World” on it. When leaving, I saw her hauling a 5 gallon bucket (obviously filled with water and sea life) to her truck (kayak on top). She was obviously taking sea life. I regret not stopping to ask her what she was doing.

    Anyone know? Illegal? A local group convinced the County to issue an ordinance forbidding the removal of sea creatures. Are special permits issued? Is that where our local sea horses are disappearing to?
     
    Blueringocto_73 likes this.
  10. Diver below 83

    Diver below 83 Regular of the Pub

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: SoFlo
    1,146
    669
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    while I don’t know about this women I do believe sea world has programs with FAU and BC here in the ftl area. So it may be someone associated with the program.
     
    Blueringocto_73 likes this.

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