DIR- Generic Primary light with canister or handheld

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Edwaty

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Hi,

I'm currently buying my gear for the GUE Fundamentals course, and I'm a bit worried about the canister light.
My instructor asked for it, as required for a tech pass, but considering the price of the thing I want to make sure that I'm doing the right choice.

I can't really figure out why the canister would be necessary compared to a handheld similar light.
I understand that it used to be useful in a time where batteries burn time was low, but with recent ones it seems that it's not really an issue anymore. All lights now have very long burn times (>3-5 hours in high mode, sometimes much more in low, which is much more than what I'll probably be able to dive, at least in the next few years).
I've also seen comments on the cord preventing the light dropping. It's probably something to consider, but I'm not sure how severe is that issue compared to the additional risk of having that long cord and canister around you during all the dive.

Can someone help me with this? And potentially explain why a corded primary light is really better?

(The currently light on my shopping list if the Halcyon Focus 2.0 Corded Standard, but I've also considered the Handheld version, and the new FlareEXP handheld too).

Thanks!
 

Imla

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This would be a perfect question to ask your instructor. There are plenty GUE divers that dive cord-less, however the procedure for gas donation includes paying attention to the cord on the lights. There are quite a few lights that are cheaper than the HFocus though...
 

wmperry

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My instructor just had me mimic cord management, actually remove the light head, pass it under or over the long hose, and then replace it. And then loaned me a light for a few dives to get the full effect.

Definitely check with your instructor as Imla said.
 

Jpitus20

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I had a similar question when I took fundamentals. My instructor’s opinion - and I agree after taking the class - is that learning to manage the cord during gas donation prepares you best for any type of diving you will do down the road. We did discuss and acknowledge that in many applications the cordless lights are completely capable and have come a long way. With limited practice, I do find the cord to be great added security for keeping my light. As @lmla shared, this is a great topic to cover with your instructor
 

Lorenzoid

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Even if you ultimately wish to use a cordless light, it’s good to have the cord-management skill in muscle memory in case you need to borrow or rent a primary light and the only available option is a corded light. I prefer the cord for security against dropping it and because the light head weighs less without the integrated battery.

But for a Fundies course, you use whatever your instructor prefers.
 

RTodd

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Others have answered your question regarding checking with an instructor.

I have both of the lights you are considering. I use the flare for sidemount but actually prefer the focus 2.0 for light output. The focus has much better distance and the more focused beam helps with picking out details such as the cave line in a white cave, which matters for my aging eyes. However, if you do get a focus 2.0 corded, get it with a proper cannister and a cannister switch and not the one that comes standard on the lighthead. For an opinion of 1, my 14 year old used both in his fundies and chose to stick with the focus 2.0.
 

AJ

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Hi,

I'm currently buying my gear for the GUE Fundamentals course, and I'm a bit worried about the canister light.
My instructor asked for it, as required for a tech pass, but considering the price of the thing I want to make sure that I'm doing the right choice.
Borrow one for class and after that use what you want. I have both. For the GUE doubles it fits in the total system. With sidemount, I find a cable very annoying and use a handheld. It's a tool for the job.
 

tbone1004

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Hi,

I'm currently buying my gear for the GUE Fundamentals course, and I'm a bit worried about the canister light.
My instructor asked for it, as required for a tech pass, but considering the price of the thing I want to make sure that I'm doing the right choice.

I can't really figure out why the canister would be necessary compared to a handheld similar light.
I understand that it used to be useful in a time where batteries burn time was low, but with recent ones it seems that it's not really an issue anymore. All lights now have very long burn times (>3-5 hours in high mode, sometimes much more in low, which is much more than what I'll probably be able to dive, at least in the next few years).
I've also seen comments on the cord preventing the light dropping. It's probably something to consider, but I'm not sure how severe is that issue compared to the additional risk of having that long cord and canister around you during all the dive.

Can someone help me with this? And potentially explain why a corded primary light is really better?

(The currently light on my shopping list if the Halcyon Focus 2.0 Corded Standard, but I've also considered the Handheld version, and the new FlareEXP handheld too).

Thanks!
Cord management is the name of the game with that, if you don't want to invest in one, then see if you can borrow one from the instructor or a friend for the course.
 

PfcAJ

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Hi,

I'm currently buying my gear for the GUE Fundamentals course, and I'm a bit worried about the canister light.
My instructor asked for it, as required for a tech pass, but considering the price of the thing I want to make sure that I'm doing the right choice.

I can't really figure out why the canister would be necessary compared to a handheld similar light.
I understand that it used to be useful in a time where batteries burn time was low, but with recent ones it seems that it's not really an issue anymore. All lights now have very long burn times (>3-5 hours in high mode, sometimes much more in low, which is much more than what I'll probably be able to dive, at least in the next few years).
I've also seen comments on the cord preventing the light dropping. It's probably something to consider, but I'm not sure how severe is that issue compared to the additional risk of having that long cord and canister around you during all the dive.

Can someone help me with this? And potentially explain why a corded primary light is really better?

(The currently light on my shopping list if the Halcyon Focus 2.0 Corded Standard, but I've also considered the Handheld version, and the new FlareEXP handheld too).

Thanks!
The cord doesn't really get in the way on real dives, and like you said, it helps you not lose your light. Many tears will be shed if you drop your fancy light when you're on deco.

Cord also gives you options if it has E/O. Swap light heads (video, backup), swap batteries, and leaks are isolated by having the EO in the middle.
 
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