Instructor blacks out during deep dive course - Stoney Cove, UK

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Wibble

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Their shore launched lifeboats are also volunteers and funded by charity. Learn about the RNLI - What does RNLI stand for and more
The RNLI is excellent. And free to use. The Royal National Lifeboat Institution also covers Ireland (pre-partition). Brits and Irish are rightly proud of that institution. They're crewed almost entirely by volunteers.

Unlike the French version which charges a lot for recovery, so the French coastguard is always asking for passing boats to help other stranded boats - why have one stranded boat when you can have two and a real emergency.

The coastguard does have their own helicopters which handle marine rescues; typical winching recoveries. They are also free to use. As are British hypobaric chambers and medical services.
 

Wibble

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BlueTrin

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Not being political, but one side effect of it being a charity is that it does get the local population involved with fund raising.
I am neutral on the topic, I don’t have enough information to know which system is the best.

However I buy a bit of random stuff from the RNLI shop every year:

RNLI Shop | Lifesaving shopping
 

OTF

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It's an important lesson that even your instructors can have sudden issues underwater. If you see signs of trouble don't ever assume that they're fine just because they're more experienced or happen to be in charge.
 

boulderjohn

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It's an important lesson that even your instructors can have sudden issues underwater. If you see signs of trouble don't ever assume that they're fine just because they're more experienced or happen to be in charge.
I sometimes write descriptions of cave diving accidents for the National Speleological Society's American Caving Accidents publication. I wrote one that proved to be controversial, and they decided to avoid the controversy by not publishing it because it did not happen in a cave. Here is what happened.

Two divers were descending the stairs leading to the sinkhole that led to the cave, and they noticed two divers who had just finished a cave dive. One of them was floating in the water, fiddling with his gear. The other was behind him, lying face down, unconscious. The two divers pulled him out and revived him on the stairs. EMT's arrived and treated him, but he refused further medical help. He said he knew why it happened. It had happened before, and it would happen again.

He was an OW scuba instructor. He might be yours some day.
 

kelemvor

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Unlike the French version which charges a lot for recovery, so the French coastguard is always asking for passing boats to help other stranded boats - why have one stranded boat when you can have two and a real emergency.
I must assume in France and the UK that things are different. In the US, you're legally required to help another boat in distress. Of course we also have the federally funded Coast Guard... which is kind of like a non-optional charity contribution that you can't write off.
 

BlueTrin

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I must assume in France and the UK that things are different. In the US, you're legally required to help another boat in distress. Of course we also have the federally funded Coast Guard... which is kind of like a non-optional charity contribution that you can't write off.
I think it’s an UN international law (in international waters) to have to rescue those who are at distress at sea, and it will be an obligation both in France and the UK to do so unless it is dangerous for the vessel to help.

I think the previous commenter was saying that the French coastguard is trying to save money by sending other vessels to help rather than going themselves (don’t know if it is true)
 

SlugMug

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I must assume in France and the UK that things are different. In the US, you're legally required to help another boat in distress. Of course we also have the federally funded Coast Guard... which is kind of like a non-optional charity contribution that you can't write off.

One of these days, scuba-steading, will be a thing. Which happens to remind me of a certain video game, where the plot tries to demonize that sort of thing.
 

Wibble

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I think it’s an UN international law (in international waters) to have to rescue those who are at distress at sea, and it will be an obligation both in France and the UK to do so unless it is dangerous for the vessel to help.

I think the previous commenter was saying that the French coastguard is trying to save money by sending other vessels to help rather than going themselves (don’t know if it is true)
Not the coast guard, more that people don't want the French lifeboat sent out to tow them back in as they'd get a hefty bill. This has unintended consequences.

Whilst the lifeboat will go out and tow you back in even if you've been a blithering idiot; you won't be charged and you will have to suffer the journey being lectured. Thinking about it, I think they will charge if it's gross negligence or the sort. Generally the RNLI are incredibly helpful and will come out in atrocious conditions simply because they know it can only get worse.
 
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