Question Identification and help for these old tanks

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ScubaBunga

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I've uncovered the markings on one of the tanks. They just had their 62nd birthday in June:

VOIT
ICC-3AA1880
HK 1715
6<N inside a diamond>60+

A few final questions:
Is "HK 1715" just a serial number?
Is there really no service lifetime for steel tanks if they're still in good enough physical condition to requalify, or should they be retired regardless?
If I take them to hydro (after cleaning) is there any documentation I should find/attach, like I've read about helping for hot-dip galvanized steel 72's?
The n in the diamond is a Norris tank. The hk1715 should be the serial number. Should be a great tank if the inside is clean.
 

Tracy

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I've uncovered the markings on one of the tanks. They just had their 62nd birthday in June:

VOIT
ICC-3AA1880
HK 1715
6<N inside a diamond>60+

A few final questions:
Is "HK 1715" just a serial number?
Is there really no service lifetime for steel tanks if they're still in good enough physical condition to requalify, or should they be retired regardless?
If I take them to hydro (after cleaning) is there any documentation I should find/attach, like I've read about helping for hot-dip galvanized steel 72's?
I would double check that 1880 isn't actually an 1800. Not saying you are wrong, I have just never seen a Norris 40 with an 1880 working pressure.
The HK1715 is indeed the serial.
First hydrotest was June of 1960.

The tanks have a bit of cool factor with their age and being mini doubles. Outside of that, there isn't any value to them and they weren't that great of a tank to dive, it is just what was available. They will be very heavy for the volume of gas they provide.

You won't need anything to get them hydro tested. Being a standard 3AA tank makes them able to be tested anywhere by almost anyone.

There is no set life limit with steel tanks. I have a few bulk oxygen cylinders from 1911 and my oldest scuba is from 1946. All are regularly tested and in good working order.
 

broncobowsher

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1911 is impressive. I have only had them dated back to 1918. I have a pair in the garage right now that are dated to the day (not month/year as typical) and they were born on the same day, even through they are from different makers. 9-1-42 so WWII production.
 

Tracy

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1911 is impressive. I have only had them dated back to 1918. I have a pair in the garage right now that are dated to the day (not month/year as typical) and they were born on the same day, even through they are from different makers. 9-1-42 so WWII production.
They are cool because the have never missed a five year hydro cycle. The necks are completely full of stamps. I got 30 of them out of a chrysler building that was being demolished. Three were from 1911.
They also suck horribly as they aren't ICC3AA, they are 3A and weigh nearly double a normal 200 cf oxygen cylinder. I hate moving them around.
 
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TooCold

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I would double check that 1880 isn't actually an 1800. Not saying you are wrong, I have just never seen a Norris 40 with an 1880 working pressure.
Here's a picture. Was Norris the manufacturer of Voit tanks?
VoiSteelt_markings.jpg


The paint/coating is almost 1mm thick so all marking was invisible. I ended up clearing almost the entire crown of the tank looking for newer hydro marks, so ...
but the tanks will be forever ugly.
I suppose if I fell off the deep end I could dig out the markings, feather the edge of the coating, and repaint the tanks to restore the look.

There is no set life limit with steel tanks. I have a few bulk oxygen cylinders from 1911 and my oldest scuba is from 1946. All are regularly tested and in good working order.
1911, 111 years old. Wow.

I think for me the decision is between selling / passing them on or keeping them. If I keep them, I'll have to try cleaning the insides (also something new for me) and getting them hydro'd, even if I don't dive them. They might be cool as is on display as vintage dive gear, but if they're not hydro'd they're only "used to be dive gear", which would bother me. It's one of my weakness.

And thanks everyone for the help, info, and insights. It's what makes SB a beautiful place.

[[Edit: "passing them on" ... to a good home where they will get hydro'd.]]
 

ScubaBunga

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Here's a picture. Was Norris the manufacturer of Voit tanks?
View attachment 737290

The paint/coating is almost 1mm thick so all marking was invisible. I ended up clearing almost the entire crown of the tank looking for newer hydro marks, so ...

I suppose if I fell off the deep end I could dig out the markings, feather the edge of the coating, and repaint the tanks to restore the look.


1911, 111 years old. Wow.

I think for me the decision is between selling / passing them on or keeping them. If I keep them, I'll have to try cleaning the insides (also something new for me) and getting them hydro'd, even if I don't dive them. They might be cool as is on display as vintage dive gear, but if they're not hydro'd they're only "used to be dive gear", which would bother me. It's one of my weakness.

And thanks everyone for the help, info, and insights. It's what makes SB a beautiful place.
I have a voit from around that time that is also a Norris.
 

James79

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I think for me the decision is between selling / passing them on or keeping them.
If I lived close enough to go get them, I would totally offer to take them off your hands!
Respectfully,

James
 

Tracy

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Here's a picture. Was Norris the manufacturer of Voit tanks?

Norris was the manufacturer of tanks with the Norris symbol. That is the "N" inside of a diamond.
I don't know if Voit used them exclusively, but what you pictured is certainly a Norris.
That 1880 is a new one for me. Cool tank.
 

captain

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At my work place I ran across an oxygen cylinder dated 1898. Of course that was about 30 years ago so no telling if it is still in service.
 
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