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Hull cleaners- post your gadgets!

Discussion in 'Commercial Divers' started by fstbttms, Mar 24, 2010.

  1. fstbttms

    fstbttms Manta Ray

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    I apologize if you felt I was condecending towards you, but I never indicated that I thought you or anybody else here, weren't "professional". I will not, however, apologize for caring enough about this profession to educate myself about the issues and argue passionately against what I know (and can prove) to be harmful to it.
     
  2. Scott T C

    Scott T C Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Charleston, SC & Bethlehem, PA
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    Hello everyone,

    I know this post is old by basically 6+ months, however I wanted to post a couple comments.

    First off, I am new to the industry of boat hull cleaning, however I met a good friend SeaJay, owner of Deep South Divers in Beaufort, SC which introduced me to the wonderful world of the above. I started diving at age of 13 (now 30, soon to be 31 in June) and was always use to clear, open waters. Once I hit the murky waters of the Tidal Waterways of Beaufort to see what he does for a living, I fell in love with the thought that I could dive every day and make decent money in the process.

    Now I still live in Pennsylvania, but visit regularly to South Carolina to see my folks who live in the Charleston Area. I decided that being in the construction and contracting field was just not for me any more (I owned/operated STC Construction & Contracting, LLC.) after tearing up two of my Lumbar Disks which required surgery on April 5th of 2011 to fuse the vertebrates together. Although the business was successful, it just grew old fast remodeling bathrooms, kitchens, etc. and working 12+ hour days…sometimes for almost free depending on the job.

    So I decided to start my own Commercial Level SCUBA Diving company; Henceforth, Anubis Divers, LLC. was born. I will be attending the Commercial Diving Academy (CDA.edu) in Jacksonville, FL this year if all my cards fall properly into place, to obtain my Commercial Diver Certification (Unrestricted Surface Supplied Air), Topside & Underwater Welding, Non-Destructive Inspections, Demolition, EMT (Emergency Medical Technician), DMT (Dive Medical Technician), HCT (Hyperbaric Chamber Technician) & Master SCUBA Diver/Instructor; Ratings/Certifications.

    I will take this and apply it to my new business when I move to the Charleston area within the next year or two.

    Anyway, onto the topic at hand...

    I want to say that BOTH are appropriate methods of cleaning hulls. In Charleston, SC you will be surprised how often you need a spackle knife to "pop" off (notice how I didn't say scrape) the barnacle growth. The brushes used should be soft enough to protect the paint surfaces as much as possible. A scrub pad can be used if the customer has their boat cleaned REGUARLY...and I STRESS REGUARLY. Otherwise, you will need to clean the hulls with more "force".

    I still STRESS, that you do not "scrape" the hull for reasons already mentioned in this thread.

    As also previously stated in this thread, we (the ones who perform the services and represent the industry) need to take any and all measures/methods to do the job properly as to minimize any negative impact on the environment as possible at all times. Using a pad to clean the hull may "appear" to remove the paint more, however; you need to remember that there are other forces at work on that paint just like the paint of your automobile. Oxidation, chemical corrosion and more happens even under water; especially in the saltwater environments in the Carolinas. A lot of what you are seeing is just that, as you are only removing a very small amount of the boat's coating by using a scotch pad or the likes.

    Just look at it from this perspective: what has the potential of removing more paint...a piece of 180 grit sand paper or a 5-in-one tool on a painted piece of wood? Sure the sandpaper removes a VERY small layer of paint, but negates the POSSIBILITY of removing "chunks" of paint. This analogy applies directly to a boat's hull and the paint that protects it.

    So, in closing...I see valuable points and arguments from both sides of this discussion and say that ya’ll (on both sides) need to try to see it through the other's eyes. We all have our "methods" of doing tasks...while mine or yours might be "better" or "more efficient", does that really mean it is truly better than the next man's methods? Answer...no. It just means that it works for "me" and though it might not work for you...it doesn’t necessarily mean "I" am wrong for doing it the way "I" have decided to do it. (Tried to write this in a third person sense.)

    Have a great one and dive safe!

    Make money, live prosperous.

    -Scott
     
  3. tsunamimike

    tsunamimike Angel Fish

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Myrtle Beach, SC
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    Has anyone tried to use the firm thick rubber squeegees used for floors? they sell them at home depot and there about 24" long and the rubber itself is really firm and about a 1/4" thick i think it would work great for getting the green hair algae off
     
  4. fstbttms

    fstbttms Manta Ray

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    The grassy algae I see typically needs to be shaved off with a metal scraper. I doubt a squeegee would get the job done.
     
  5. DivingOtter

    DivingOtter Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Toms River NJ
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    I just did a job yesterday where it was supposed to be a double wheel removal. Turned out just alot of crap around the wheels and some hard marine growth. I did however inform the owner of areas that needed attention such as the growth and suggested trying to take her for a spin before removing them. If my company does any job for anything besides a commercial vessel we always do a full inspection. I was able to see where another diver had left his mark by gouges and scrape marks along the hull. Funny part is, he had the vessel services monthly. Two months had past and beside the hard growth around the moving components you could just wipe any growth away with your hand. I mentioned that to him and he informed me that was the reason he no longer uses the last individual.
     
  6. tsunamimike

    tsunamimike Angel Fish

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Myrtle Beach, SC
    22
    0
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    i have run into an old divers work a few times in my area, typically i have found that the best method of cleaning for me is a series of brushes or the 3m white pads ( thank you fstbttms )
    if i run into the occasional boat with heavy barnical growth i will use a plastic scraper one that will give a little before chipping any bottom paint off or damaging fiberglass.

    as for getting a nice firm grip on the side of the boat to clean the water line i use cheap versions of the suction cups used for installing windows or glass that way you can release suction quite easy when ready to move
    (just thought i would share that last one)
     
  7. fstbttms

    fstbttms Manta Ray

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    [​IMG]
     
  8. tsunamimike

    tsunamimike Angel Fish

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Myrtle Beach, SC
    22
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    fstbttms this is what i use. when you want to remove you simply unlatch the handle to release suction
    [​IMG]Not to mention i will follow up with a nice beer at the end of the day :D
     
  9. fstbttms

    fstbttms Manta Ray

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    I like mine because it is cheap, almost indestructible and holds just tight enough to let me get some leverage but still releases with a slight twist. But we're on the same page, beer-wise. :eyebrow:
     
  10. tsunamimike

    tsunamimike Angel Fish

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Myrtle Beach, SC
    22
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    haha most definitely, i picked up a few of these suction cups at a place similar to a harbor freight for under 6 dollars a piece.
    i believe i have watched a few of your videos on youtube what sort of compressor/ hookah system do you use?
     

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