How to correctly hold the regulator

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I'm coming back to diving after a long absence and I'm loving all the resources online!

Something I've noticed from looking at youtube videos is how the second stage is gripped when removing and replacing it. I would be familiar with holding the second stage itself, but in the videos some instructors grip the hose and connector instead. One video stated that this was the correct way to hold it.

Does this side-grip come from tech diving? Or do different agencies teach different grips? What are the advantages of the side-grip?

TIA!
 

rhwestfall

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Some 30+ years ago when buddy breathing was a thing, we were taught to grip the stage by the hose/body (basic scuba certification). This allowed the recipient to manipulate the purge if needed...

YMMV
 

Seaweed Doc

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I initially thought you were talking about sharing air, but you're just referring to removing and replacing? For remove/replace, I don't think it matters. I suppose holding by the hose gets you in the habit for the correct grip in shared air situations. Might also be easier for folks with small hands. On the other hand, holding by the body gives you quick access to the purge button.


For shared air:

I teach hose grip so the recipient has access to the purge button.

I don't think the grip is a formal part of the standard, but I also don't know any current instructors that teach anything but hose grip.

I'm curious what other grips are taught?

I should add that this presumes the donor is handing the second stage to the recipient. I'm aware that an alternative is to expect the recipient to get the second themselves.
 

Seaweed Doc

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There is still a protocol for handling, no? Have we gotten that poor in teaching how to help?
There are different techniques for shared air. I teach a pretty standard protocol where the donor hands off.

The alternative I've heard of is for the donor to assume a "starfish" pose, face up and head away from recipient. This makes the secondary second stage obviously accessible to the recipient. A different protocol. Could be wrong, but I've heard this is a BSAC technique?

I think the key is good buddy communication: Which protocol will be used?
 
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I initially thought you were talking about sharing air, but you're just referring to removing and replacing? For remove/replace, I don't think it matters. I suppose holding by the hose gets you in the habit for the correct grip in shared air situations. Might also be easier for folks with small hands. On the other hand, holding by the body gives you quick access to the purge button.


For shared air:

I teach hose grip so the recipient has access to the purge button.

I don't think the grip is a formal part of the standard, but I also don't know any current instructors that teach anything but hose grip.

I'm curious what other grips are taught?

I should add that this presumes the donor is handing the second stage to the recipient. I'm aware that an alternative is to expect the recipient to get the second themselves.

I found the video that first brought it to my attention
At 0:45 the narrator mentions how the diver is covering the regulator when switching and after training at 3:40 he mentions how she's now holding the regulator "correctly". I've searched for videos on replacing the regulator and have found that instructors that show how to do it in neutral buoyancy tend to used the hose grip and those that demonstrate from a kneeling position tend to hold the reg itself. That's what got me wondering if it was agency or tech diving related.

You're probably right in that it's to reinforce correct technique when sharing the octopus, I should probably have thought of that :oops:
 

lowwall

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If the reg is coming into your mouth, which includes a remove and replace, then hold it by the body so you have access to the purge.

If you are presenting it to someone for an air share, including practice drill, hold it by the hose.
 

decompression

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If I may…….you are looking at 2 different scenarios……

reg remove/replace, is a diver removing his own reg for whatever reason…..any grip is acceptable as they are in control.

primary donate, diver donating their primary, in this case best practice is a hose grip to allow the receiving diver access to purge and complete stage for firm handover.
 

DAJ

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JMHO, it doesn’t really matter what method you choose as a controlled simulation is going to be much easier than reality. If someone is in a true OOA situation, they are not going to swim over to you, get your attention, give you the OOA signal, and wait for you to present them with a regulator. Especially if they go to take breath and they have no air flow. Chances are they are going to bolt for the surface or swim over and either grab your primary or secondary regulator as they will be in major panic mode. Hopefully you see them coming towards you as it will obvious that there is a problem.

The strained last few breaths of running a cylinder dry is one thing but a sudden equipment failure is another. We are all taught to hand off a regulator but they don’t really cover what to do if you are just looking at a fish and the next second your mask is knocked off your face and your regulator is pulled out of your mouth. Granted, a controlled exchange may occur depending on the diver but that will probably be a rare outcome. Again, my opinion. It’s one thing to have a major equipment failure(s) that might create this versus just running out of air. If it’s the latter, stop diving and pick another hobby where you are not required to monitor anything or pay attention to what you are doing.
 

lowwall

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If I may…….you are looking at 2 different scenarios……

reg remove/replace, is a diver removing his own reg for whatever reason…..any grip is acceptable as they are in control.

primary donate, diver donating their primary, in this case best practice is a hose grip to allow the receiving diver access to purge and complete stage for firm handover.
Yes. I just watched the video. The narrator is using the term "remove and replace" for presenting the reg and "exchange" for switching. The diver in the after part is mostly doing it correctly.
 
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