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How often do you need a 400ft primary reel?

Discussion in 'Cave Diving' started by Manatee Diver, Jun 19, 2020.

  1. ofg-1

    ofg-1 Course Director

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    Yes, you need a 400 foot reel. You need to run the line back and forth across the floor of the cave, run it up then down the wall for no reason, make numerous wraps around fragile points that will break and leave feet of slack, knot it at 8 feet instead of 10 so people will think they made it further in the cave and that their scooter is really fast, you need a lot of extra line to work into all those line traps along the way, pull it really tight over silt mounds so it sinks in a couple of feet, all of that takes extra line so a 400 foot reel is in order.
     
    eleniel, Jack Hammer, gbf and 4 others like this.
  2. rjack321

    rjack321 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Port Orchard, WA
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    I don't like the attitude that Rog is here to show guests the best stuff in the cave. It's just far to easy for that perspective to lead to trust me dives - especially if the client brings a camera. Historically in MX you would go to a shop and they'd give you a stick map or description vaguely outlining where the turnoff from the highway was and then how or where to find the cenote and the how the line was down, right, up 200ft in etc etc. which ends to some sand bagging, an adventure, and diver engagement in their own success. In this case, finding the chamber of the ancients isn't that hard if you're given directions. And if you need to hire a buddy that's cool too, but being led there not so much.
     
    arthurng311 likes this.
  3. Manatee Diver

    Manatee Diver Stop throwing lettuce at me! ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: None - Not Certified
    Location: Tampa Bay, FL
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    It is almost like you've seen me running lines in Ginnie.
     
    Mark IV, eleniel and tmassey like this.
  4. Manatee Diver

    Manatee Diver Stop throwing lettuce at me! ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: None - Not Certified
    Location: Tampa Bay, FL
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    Yes it certainly does lack a certain sense of adventure. Though Xu-Lo was the most off the beaten path cave we dove, and even it had working bathrooms and decent stairs. We visited Chanal (sp?) which was literally in someone's front yard, but we didn't dive it due to a huge wasps nest right over the cave.
     
  5. rjack321

    rjack321 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Port Orchard, WA
    10,135
    4,456
    113
    It goes both ways, sometimes you just can't get to someplace without a guide, someone on the approved list, or with the key or whatever.
    But for your first time to the regular open for everyone sites - I encourage people to get verbal directions, a stick map, and treat it like personal exploration even if there's an established line in there eventually.
     
  6. rddvet

    rddvet DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Florida
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    chan hol
     
  7. halocline

    halocline Solo Diver

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    My experience (all in MX, never dove in FL caves) has been that once I have had to search a bit for the mainline in a new place to me and maybe spent a little too much time and gas on it, I tend to really remember where it is next time. When I've been guided and the guide is running the line, I could still wander around a bit looking for it myself next time I'm there. The stick maps and general directions are certainly helpful, but there's no substitute for familiarity. I'm sure divers have had a few laughs looking at my first time routes to the mainline.

    Getting back to the original question, how often do you need a 400ft primary, I guess my answer would be almost never do you absolutely need 400 ft, but you do need more than 200 ft fairly often in MX.
     

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