Guns for freeshafting on Scuba

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BoltSnap

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Are there specific/special guns used for freeshafting on Scuba? What brands and models please? Can any gun be used for freeshafting or does it have to be made for this purpose specifically?

(I am just learning about freeshafting and watching YouTube videos but I don't know much about it at all).
 

CuzzA

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Remove a line and any gun can freeshaft, but some are designed for the job.

You want a long gun, which equals a long shaft, which equal more ballast to slow down a big fish with a poor shot. 60 inch shafts are what I use.

On scuba I think it's much better to have a gun that has a longer butt stock to balance the gun while diving as with a freeshaft setup you'll have one or two spare shafts and they tend to end up muzzle heavy, and you load from the hip.

I personally demand a gun that can be back loaded for speed of reloading. Which is important when freeshafting because bigger fish may need multiple shafts to be able to land them. Consequently that requires an open track with a closed muzzle. So for commercially made guns that basically narrows me down to a Biller or Ocean Rhino. My gun is actually a 54" teak Biller with the handguard cut off the grip and an Ocean Rhino muzzle. An old commercial Sea Hornet muzzle would be best if you can find one.

Setting my preferences aside, Koah also makes a decent scuba gun. The Battle Axe being their top choice. But it is an enclosed track.

Finally Death From Above Spearguns here in Tampa Bay has develop and patented his Snap Track. This is probably the biggest advancement in gun making in many years next to SpearGods Evolution Shaft, which I use as it allows you to easily convert to a line shaft if the situation calls for it, without needing a shark fin shaft. So for lineshafting a big jack, cobia or a fish deep inside a wreck or ledge.

I'm very much tempted to make the move to the snap track gun. It does require shark fin shafts, but reloads just as quick as back loading with the benefit of the more accurate closed track section which is part of the snap.
 
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BoltSnap

BoltSnap

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Finally Death From Above Spearguns here in Tampa Bay has develop and patented his Snap Track. This is probably the biggest advancement in gun making in many years next to SpearGods Evolution Shaft, which I use as it allows you to easily convert to a line shaft if the situation calls for it, without needing a shark fin shaft. So for lineshafting a big jack, cobia or a fish deep inside a wreck or ledge.

I'm a very much tempted to make the move to the snap track gun. It does require shark fin shafts, but reloads just as quick as back loading with the benefit of the more accurate closed track.

You the MAN!!


So I should just go with the Snap track gun?
 

Belzelbub

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There are some that work well for freeshafting, and other brands that won’t. You can tell by looking at the way the spear is held close to the barrel at the front. If it’s held down by the line, it’s not an ideal setup for freeshafting. Riffe guns, for example have a loop of line.

Most freeshaft guns have an enclosed muzzle. Ocean Rhino,AB Biller, and several others have an enclosed muzzle, and are often used for Freeshafting. If you look at the muzzle of an Ocean Rhino and compare it to the AB Biller, you’ll see that the shaft hole is larger. This allows for back loading. Instead of backing the shaft all the way through the muzzle to the mechanism, you can poke the shaft through the back of the muzzle.

Koahs are another brand that is often used, but instead of a muzzle, they have an enclosed track. The track pretty much surrounds the spear. You must muzzle load this type, and use special shark fin shafts. But, the enclosed track guns are incredibly accurate.

Another thing you’ll find is that wood guns are best for freeshafting. Most freeshafters take along a spare shaft or two mounted to the side of the gun. Most freeshaft guns also have a butt after the handle. That makes it easier to load the bands.

Another thing to look at is the line. There will be times when freeshafters may need to lineshaft to get a fish up in the water column, or deep under a ledge. Ocean Rhinos come with a speed load line kit. This makes it easier to wrap the line on the release. It works well, but there are some drawbacks, as there is no way to attach a line to a standard freeshaft. So, if you need to lineshaft, you need to unload the freeshaft first, then hook up the lineshaft. Koah Battleaxe uses a ring that you can slide over the tip of the spear, and it will catch on the shark fin on the shaft. Speargods also makes what they call the Evolution ring and Evolution shafts for AB Biller, Ocean Rhino, Sea Hornet guns. It’s a pretty slick adaptation. The Evolution shafts have a milled section by the flopper to allow the ring to pass over the flopper, and there is a crimped section at the bottom of the shaft to catch the ring.
 
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BoltSnap

BoltSnap

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@Belzelbub Thank you so much you are very kind.

This is a whole new type of spearfishing. Many people will be interested in these guns here in Libya.
 

Scraps

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I started freeshafting a few months ago because dealing with either the line or the coiled plastic alternative was a hassle. I was worried about losing shafts, but it hasn’t happened because I’m always shooting down. Haven’t attempted to shoot anything pelagic yet.

@Belzebub is more advanced/ambitious in his hunting than I am, but for the bottom fishing I do at my rudimentary skill level, freeshafting so far seems simpler and easier. I think it has also improved my accuracy and range/velocity—the line can’t help the shaft fly straight or far.

As far as the gun, I have a basic entry-level 48” Biller with 60” shafts. I carry one spare just tied to the gun with bungee cord—works fine and keeps the gun negatively buoyant until I use the spare.

Best wishes,
 
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BoltSnap

BoltSnap

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I would. It is pretty slick. My only hesitation is I have a dozen or so notched shafts and a fully functional gun.

I am starting from zero, or actually I have all shark fins so I can use them with this gun :)
 

Johnoly

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I know @CuzzA will differ and that's alright because we do 2 different types of shooting(long & close range)

But one question you have to ask is "why don't they make open track rifle barrels?"

The archer's paradox very much accounts for missed shots in spearfishing

Guns don't kill,,,,,accuracy does.

 

Brant Emery

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I’m not trying to upset the apple cart here, just an honest question. I shot fish for almost 8 years when I worked on a live aboard in the Bahamas and we used a Hawaiian sling. My biggest was a 65# grouper.

Why not use one?
 

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