• Welcome to ScubaBoard


  1. Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

    Benefits of registering include

    • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
    • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
    • You can make this box go away

    Joining is quick and easy. Login or Register now by clicking on the button

G9 Close Up Pics of Tiny Critters in South Florida!

Discussion in 'The Canon Corner' started by SFLDiver3445, Aug 18, 2008.

  1. SFLDiver3445

    SFLDiver3445 Photographer

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Pompano Beach, FL
    559
    25
    18
    There continues to be lots of buzz within this forum about the Canon G9 and all the different housing and lens options. If you've seen some of my previous posts, you probably know that I chose to go with the G9 in the Patima Housing. I also use several different Inon lenses and dual Inon Z-240 Strobes.

    I normally shoot wide angle shots with the Inon UWL-100 Lens, but yesterday, I decided to go out and shoot some close-up shots using my Inon UCL-165M67 lenses, so I thought I'd post a few of the shots I captured, to give readers here an idea of some of the results I achieved.

    Please keep in mind that, the blennies within these pictures are extremely small, probably about 1/3 to 1/2 the diameter of the size of the eraser on a pencil, maybe even smaller. Also, the shots of the blennies were taken with both UCL-167M67 lenses stacked together. I did crop some of these pictures a bit, but let me assure you, I was taking shots yesterday, where I couldn't zoom in completely, because I was having trouple keeping the entire blenny within the LCD.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Adrian
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2008
  2. deeper thoughts

    deeper thoughts Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location:
    6,321
    2,125
    113
    Very Nice
     
  3. matva

    matva Angel Fish

    60
    0
    0
    ^^ what he said.

    Did you do any post WB adjustment? I really like the 4th one.

    by the way, i noticed you're in pompano.. was this dive out of pompano? i did a dive last weekend out of pompano... we did the united caribbean and a reef, i forget which one.

    I'm actually considering a g9 rig. sold my s70 awhile back.
     
  4. stu_in_fl

    stu_in_fl Divemaster

    # of Dives:
    Location: newly land-locked in Cinci-freaking-natti
    797
    3
    0
    great detail on #2,, 3 and 4. i've never managed to take a sharp pic of those little buggers.
     
  5. tuner fish

    tuner fish Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    125
    0
    0
  6. SFLDiver3445

    SFLDiver3445 Photographer

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Pompano Beach, FL
    559
    25
    18
    I do not shoot in RAW format, but instead chose to shoot in straight JPEG format instead and keep the camera on auto white balance.

    I do some simple post shot editing, but nothing too extreme, because I don't own Photoshop or any other software with extreme picture altering capability.
     
  7. SFLDiver3445

    SFLDiver3445 Photographer

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Pompano Beach, FL
    559
    25
    18
    Thanks for all the compliments!

    I hope this serves as a good example of what kind of close-up stuff can be achieved with the G9 and a couple of Inon close-up lenses, because I can't stress enough how small these little critters were.

    The only trade-off that comes with zooming in this close, is the depth of field, which really suffers in the process. Unfortunately, these little guys weren't in the very best spot, as they were up on different walls of the wreck I was diving, so I wasn't always able to steady myself and take the shot from the most ideal angle, but I tried. In fact, if you ask anyone who was on the dive yesterday, they'll tell you that at times, I was literally upside down like Spiderman on the wall of the wreck trying to get a better angle, but that made it pretty tough to steady the shot, especially when trying to shoot these tiny guys.

    Adrian
     
  8. Mel Moncrieff

    Mel Moncrieff Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Southern California
    121
    16
    18
    Shots 3 & 4 are just great! I have been shooting mostly wide-angle with my G9, but I did recently purchase a 67 mm closeup lens 4T that I plan to try. I have the Ike housing with the short port for wide angle. Do you think I should put the other back on so I can zoom out all the way, or just put the closeup lens on and get closer? How are out were you from these shots?

    Mel
     
  9. SFLDiver3445

    SFLDiver3445 Photographer

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Pompano Beach, FL
    559
    25
    18
    Hi Mel,

    Thank you for the compliment on the shots!

    I'm not sure exactly what the "67 mm closeup lens 4T" is, but I'll assume it's at least similar to the Inon 165M67 lenses I use.

    If you plan on shooting close-up, I would definitely switch ports for it. The G9 lens protrudes out pretty far, and you want to make sure you can take full advantage of the camera's capabilites, which can only be accomplished with the longer port.

    However, please bear in mind that all but the last shot in the set I posted were taken with 2 Inon lenses stacked on top of each other, which is why I was able to really blow up this tiny critters. However, with both lenses mounted, I really need to get close. For the really close-up Blenny shoots I posted, the tip of my lens was probably 3" to 6" inches away from my subject, when I really zoomed in and filled the picture with the critters face.

    Hope that helps and good luck with your pics!

    Adrian
     
  10. Ryan

    Ryan Dive Shop

    356
    19
    18
    Good show Adrian.

    Keep in mind that a diopter loses 3/4 of its strength in water. The inon diopters are very strong, equivalent to something like +12 or +16, and provide a very tolerable amount of image degradation for such a strong lens.

    I also agree with Adrian about using the longer port.
     

Share This Page