Ear pressure post dive

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Angelo Farina

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The best part of doing it with my jaw now is that I don't even have to touch my nose. If I feel the slightest bit of pressure on my ear, I just move my jaw and I'm equalized. I don't know why it took me so long to figure it out, but I am so glad I finally did.
You can improve further: there is no need to move the jaw, there is a specific muscle which opens the tube. Moving the jaw also stimulates the movement of the muscle. But you can contract the muscle without moving the yaw.
This method is called BTV: How to Do Hands-Free Equalization (BTV/VTO) - OpenWaterHQ
 

Duke Dive Medicine

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@Angelo Farina out of curiosity, have you run into anyone who wasn't able to learn BTV/VTO?
 

Angelo Farina

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@Angelo Farina out of curiosity, have you run into anyone who wasn't able to learn BTV/VTO?
Unfortunately yes, it appears that BTV is feasible only by just one diver every three, on average.
I do not have the knowledge of the reasons: perhaps for some people the Eustachian tubes are not easy to open, or perhaps some people do not have proper control on their muscles. For example, I noticed that people who cannot do BTV usually do not have the control for moving their ears, or curving their tongue as an U.
It seems that there is a genetic base on possessing these muscular control capabilities:
 

Duke Dive Medicine

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Unfortunately yes, it appears that BTV is feasible only by just one diver every three, on average.
I do not have the knowledge of the reasons: perhaps for some people the Eustachian tubes are not easy to open, or perhaps some people do not have proper control on their muscles. For example, I noticed that people who cannot do BTV usually do not have the control for moving their ears, or curving their tongue as an U.
It seems that there is a genetic base on possessing these muscular control capabilities:
Thanks! Interesting information. I'm an ear-wiggler and can do VTO and always wondered if the two were correlated.
 

GreggS

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I can wiggle my ears, also, but never thought to try equalizing that way. Well, guess I've got something to try next time in the water.
 

Angelo Farina

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I can wiggle my ears, also, but never thought to try equalizing that way. Well, guess I've got something to try next time in the water.
They require different muscles. I can move the ears without opening the tubes, or open the tubes without moving my ears. Of course I can also perform both actions simultaneously, if I want...
But not everyone can control their muscles separately: for some people, the ear-opening muscles are "logically connected" with other actions: swallowing, yawning, moving the jaw, making some sound such as "kh", etc.
 
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