Do you count weight of regulator?

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boulderjohn

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Almost every online weight calculator I have tried tells me to use double the weight that I know I actually need.

The ScubaBoard online calculator cited by Tursiops is more accurate.
 

Alaskan Scuba Dude

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Quick simple question :)

VAST majority of my diving has been in warm water and I've usually been good with just a 6 pound steel back plate (but I also carried 2 metal flashlights that maybe weighed 1 lb combined). I'm average build and body fat and basically all diving has been done with Al80. I have about 200 dives total.

So, for the first time I'm going to be diving a 5mm full suit and online calculators say I need 17 - 20 pounds (depending on which online calculator).

So my question is, do you factor in weight of regulator / flashlights etc to these estimations?

I'm diving a Halcion Infinity. My current thought to achieve this is:
Halcyon 6 lb SS backplate and add my weight bar (weighted STA) = 12 lbs on back.
Regulator = 2lbs.
And then add ~3-4 lbs on each hip integrated weight pocket on the belt strap.

Does this make sense? And should it result in safe and trimmed equal weighting? (I have a 20lb lift wing). SITF scenario is 12 pounds integrated weights plus regulator = 14 pounds to kick against if BC failure...

Thanks!!!!
Do you know how to do a weight check while in the water?

Buoyancy Check in 4 Simple Steps
  • Enter the water wearing all gear and an estimated amount of starting weight. ...
  • With the regulator in your mouth, take and hold a normal to full breath.
  • Deflate your BCD – If you are “properly” weighted you should float at eye level and when you exhale you should descend.
 

mdwalter

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I think your problem is simpler than you might realize. If the only change you are making is from your current exposure suit to a 5 mm suit, then you need to add lead for that difference. It sounds like you may not have been wearing a suit before? You can probably start the "experiment" by adding about 8 lbs to offset the 5 mm suit - if you wore none before.
Yeah, an easy way to calculate this difference is to simply put the 5mm suit in a pool (it will float), then start throwing weights on top until it sinks below the surface (but not to the bottom). Then just add this much weight to whatever you normally use without the suit (in an appropriate location on your body to keep you in good trim). This should be pretty close to right for you, assuming the addition of the suit is the only change you are making to your normal setup. The weight of the regs, lights, etc. was already factored in to the weight you already carry, so does not need to be known for this method.
 

mdwalter

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Great responses here. Yes, I will do a weight check. I guess the issue that puzzled me was the high calculations for weight on calculators. This got me thinking that when I say "I dive with just 6 pounds with no wetsuit" that maybe really I'm over that by a few pounds for reg and lights so closer to 8 or even 9 lbs.
I was also thinking a bit (concerned?) about weighting up to near the limit of the wing lift.

I appreciate the comments and discussion.
Since the weight you will add to compensate for the suit is ONLY to compensate for the suit, if the wing you have can lift the tanks and other gear you have now, it will also be able to lift all that same gear with the suit and the weight for the suit (because the bouyancy of the suit is actually lifting the extra weight you added to compensate for the boyancy of the suit).
 

inquisit

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the bouyancy of the suit is actually lifting the extra weight you added
Much of that suit buoyancy goes away at depth, so the wing still needs to provide greater compensation than it did with the thin suit. Additionally, if that additional weight is placed on the rig, the wing needs to be able to lift it *without* the benefit of the additional wetsuit buoyancy. (You may have a need to remove it, say, prior to getting back in a boat.)
 
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