Desiccant for Tanks?

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USFishin

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I doubt that I am the first person to ever think about this. Is there any kind of desiccant that you can put into a tank that is safe for the air that is in the tank? I read that silica gel is irritating to the respiratory tract. Is there some other desiccant out there that would be oxygen safe and safe for breathing? I think that would be a great preventative for rust in steel tanks. Yes, you would have something bouncing around in your tank, but I doubt it would even be noticeable.

Thoughts?
 
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As a trained service tech, I would not recommend you place anything in the tank of this nature. Ideally, steel tanks are treated with a flash rust inhibitor after hydrostatic testing and subsequent tumbling with a non-toxic degreasing agent such as Simple Green. Once you've treated the tank properly, you should not have to worry about further rusting in the tank unless it goes empty and is left open. You should never leave your tanks with <100-200psi and if you're storing them in the cold, do fill them completely before storing .....
 

Doc Harry

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Is there any kind of desiccant that you can put into a tank that is safe for the air that is in the tank?

No. Nothing.
 

zaberman1

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Don't put anything in the tank, it could be grounds for rejecting the cylinder...there are coatings that you can apply through a trained facility, however, that does not damage the integrity of the cylinder.
 

USFishin

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I am not going to be putting anything in my tank, just wondering if there was anything out there. Someone could probably be rich if they came up with something like the silica gel packs that were O2 compatible and safe for the air you're breathing from the tank.
 

Doc Harry

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I am not going to be putting anything in my tank, just wondering if there was anything out there. Someone could probably be rich if they came up with something like the silica gel packs that were O2 compatible and safe for the air you're breathing from the tank.

You risk clogging the valve and then not being able to breathe. Not worth the risk. Financially, not worth the money in R&D.

There is no substitute for good care of your cylinders and routine inspections. Time has demonstrated this, over and over.
 

tregrrr

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there is "SOMETHING" you can put in your tanks to keep them safe... it is o2 safe and everything....

Modified grade E filtered and desiccated air. Works like a charm if done right each time...
:D
 
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Luis H

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Desiccant works by absorbing moisture. You want to absorb the moisture out of the air before it gets to the tank, not inside the tank.

If you allow moisture into the tank, any desiccant will eventually become saturated and quit working.

As mentioned above, dry air is the best protection.
 
https://www.shearwater.com/products/peregrine/
https://cylindertrainingservices.com/training-program/

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