What are the quality features of a good diving torch

Please register or login

Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

Benefits of registering include

  • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
  • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
  • You can make this box go away

Joining is quick and easy. Log in or Register now!

Elektrino

New
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Location
Germany
# of dives
50 - 99
Hello everybody,

after my wife and I have been diving for a few years now, we would like to devote ourselves to a new field, namely night diving, not exclusively, but one or two dives should be on vacation. In addition, we were already under some smaller rocky outcrops and half caves, you could usually dive into it up to a maximum of 10 m, I know that’s not to compare with real caves, but cave diving in extreme is not our thing either. In addition, we have found that the colors decrease extremely at 20m + depth, we all know in which order the colors fade and that it is quite quick. Last time our guide often turned on his diving torch underwater and corals look completely different. I don't want to disturb light-sensitive animals with the light, but in the overhangs and on the corals the lamps make a difference between pale gray and beautiful bright colors. Now my question, what is important nowadays with a diving torch and where do I move in terms of price?

I had already asked this question in another forum and actually only got recommendations for buying Tilly lamps. Hopefully that was only meant nicely, but it doesn't help me any further. At the beginning it is more important to me to know what is important in a diving torch and what things are there that you should know. At this point a brief comparison to the cell phone, quality features there would be light weight, high battery life, a good camera, whether the camera has a stabilizer, the internally built-in chip, the resolution of the display, how bright the display can be, whether it is is splash-proof or even waterproof or which glass is built into the display or how resistant it is to scratches. Some people will not necessarily need the high-performance chip, some will not need a waterproof cell phone, etc. But you have the opportunity to compare.

With a diving torch, I guess lumen and lux would be important, then to what extent I can scatter or focus the beam, there were somehow technical terms for which I have omitted and possibly also how many steps the lamp has. Length of the light duration = the strength of the batteries is of secondary importance, well they should last for an hour, but almost all of them can do that I guess. And also very important, what can a Tilly diving torch for 300 to 400 EUR do more than an inexpensive lamp from the Far East for 80 EUR?

We don't really want to take photos and film, possibly sometimes a snapshot with the Gopro but that is definitely not in the foreground, we want to enjoy the dive and the colors under water. Thank you in advance for your effort.
 

BoltSnap

Contributor
Scuba Instructor
Messages
7,467
Reaction score
3,357
Location
Nomad
# of dives
I'm a Fish!
You may want to check this forum:

 

Divin'Papaw

ScubaBoard Supporter
ScubaBoard Supporter
Messages
6,875
Reaction score
4,398
Location
Florida
# of dives
500 - 999
In addition to the points listed don’t forget:

  • Durability … Dive lights take a beating. You want one that will hold up to that.
  • Switch … What kind of a switch? Twist, slide, push button on the rear, push button on the side?
  • Tightness … narrow beam for signaling and as a spotlight or wide beam for video & photography?

ADDITION: I forgot to mention that I own 3 Bigblue lights. They're reliable and bulletproof.
 

Ucarkus

Contributor
Messages
369
Reaction score
219
Location
Berlin, Germany
# of dives
1000 - 2499
You normally need 2 lamps for night diving, main and small backup. Photo and video torches/lamps are extremely strong and they usually have wide beam. Strong and wide beam will distress the fish. If you are diving in a cave, this will not be relevant but it makes a difference in coral seas. Changing the color is also useful feature, fish and co. are more tolerant to red beam. For diving, a focused narrow beam is more useful as is less intrusive and has longer range. So ideal main torch is the one you can adjust the focus and change color. Ease of charging, battery life, some torches accept standard batteries, you are not bound with expensive oem replacements..
 

Blues Runner

ScubaBoard Supporter
ScubaBoard Supporter
Messages
166
Reaction score
308
Location
Jacksonville, FL
# of dives
500 - 999
Very happy with the light performance and customer service with Bigblue Dive Lights. I have found them to be pretty much bullet proof. My favorite and workhorse is the adjustable beam VTL2600. Great brightness and the beam width flexibility reduces the need to carry two lights. I use mine with a goodman glove which frees both hands. Not cheap but worth the expense.

https://bigbluedivelights.com/
 

hedonist222

ScubaBoard Supporter
ScubaBoard Supporter
Messages
790
Reaction score
413
Location
Dubai, AbuDhabi, United Arab Emirates
# of dives
500 - 999
Was diving in about 1.5 feet (half meter) visibility last night.
I have a nanight but brand is irrelevant.
The beam is a 35 degrees angle. I think its the best beam for piercing through darkness while also providing an illuminating dome.
10 degrees would be too tight in my experience and 100 and higher won't give you enough throw.
 

happy-diver

Skindiver Just feelin it
Messages
2,922
Reaction score
2,143
Location
Just East of Australian landfall
# of dives
2500 - 4999
Considering there is nothing to do past where you can reach and there is no requirement to see
much further than that and excessive light will only bounce off particulates straight back at you
buy cheap something your don't mind flooding chinese rechargables and dive with your hand
over the lens to filter out the light so you don't burn everythings eyeballs including your own
 

lowwall

Contributor
Messages
2,267
Reaction score
2,606
Location
Chicago
# of dives
200 - 499
Selecting a torch for recreational diving is a lot simpler and cheaper than selecting one for technical diving.

IMO, the sweet spot for recreational diving torches is an all-aluminum body, 600-1000 lumens, an 18650 rechargeable battery, a tight beam (no more than 12°, wider is for video), and at least 2 selectable light levels. There are many to choose from with these specs, most are made in Shenzhen and look very similar.

I took a quick look at amazon.de and here's an example Siuyiu Tauchlampe. The triple o-rings is characteristic of all the torches made in this factory (factories?) even though they are sold under dozens of names.

There are variations on this theme. You can get essentially the same thing in a smaller body or get one that takes a larger battery for greater run times. But I don't see a need to go up to the versions with multiple LED lamps and batteries. You won't need to go any brighter anywhere there is coral. In fact, I rarely use the brightest setting at night, it's just too much. You will also get around 3 hours out of a charge at the medium setting.

Other notes. You'll want to have two per person for night dives which is another reason to get something like this that is smaller and less expensive than the lights technical divers use. Although I will note that a lot of US cave divers do use this type as a backup on shorter dives. The DGX 600 series is very popular here for example Handheld Dive Lights
 
https://www.shearwater.com/products/swift/

Top Bottom