Using my boat as a dive platform

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Tortuga James

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Location
North Carolina
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Everything seems to have been covered here. In a nutshell, NOAA sums it up in their Small Craft Advisory warning when they say "especially vessels operated by persons without sufficient experience in heavy sea conditions."

I would like to make one point. There is nothing wrong or dangerous about going to sea with a single engine. It is not prudent if you do not have a basic understanding of engines and ship's systems. Repairs at sea can be made with the proper tools and spare parts (Impellers, belts, filters, etc.) Bad fuel will stop your engine(s) and there are plenty of other ways a twin engine boat can be totally disabled. It is ok to have 2 engines, but I totally disagree that it is any safer than one well maintained engine. Northeastern fishermen have to setting to sea in single engine boats for years in some of the most treacherous waters in the world. Personally, I would rather own/operate single engine vessels. I routinely venture 50+ miles offshore of NC with a single engine vessel. When I lived in Florida, I ran a 24' single engine diesel Topaz all over the Northern Bahamas in a couple dozen trips.

My 2 cents.
 

Asteve

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Colorado, USA
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Everything seems to have been covered here. In a nutshell, NOAA sums it up in their Small Craft Advisory warning when they say "especially vessels operated by persons without sufficient experience in heavy sea conditions."

I would like to make one point. There is nothing wrong or dangerous about going to sea with a single engine. It is not prudent if you do not have a basic understanding of engines and ship's systems. Repairs at sea can be made with the proper tools and spare parts (Impellers, belts, filters, etc.) Bad fuel will stop your engine(s) and there are plenty of other ways a twin engine boat can be totally disabled. It is ok to have 2 engines, but I totally disagree that it is any safer than one well maintained engine. Northeastern fishermen have to setting to sea in single engine boats for years in some of the most treacherous waters in the world. Personally, I would rather own/operate single engine vessels. I routinely venture 50+ miles offshore of NC with a single engine vessel. When I lived in Florida, I ran a 24' single engine diesel Topaz all over the Northern Bahamas in a couple dozen trips.

I agree BUT

I had a 37 foot that we keep in the ocean and had a mechanical, had a guess on board. I pulled up a floor board and the guess said it looks like a hardware store down there, now if I pulled a floor board on my Lake boat, he would of said it looks like a toy store down there. I would want a 8 to 10 HP kicker on the back of my lake boat for going more then about 5 miles off shore. I would be watching the weather too.
 

rhwestfall

Woof!
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"La Grande Ile"
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Have you taken the US Power Squadron Safe Boating Class? Much of the recommendations made here are verbatim to what you pick up in the class, plus a whole bunch more...
 
https://www.shearwater.com/products/teric/

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