Tips for new diver/GoProer

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toddville393

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So I'm new to Diving and GoPro and I would like to hear some tips for a newbie underwater user. I have a 3+ Black and a fair amount of mounts to include a frameless Octomask. One of my big concerns is being able to get good shots without hindering the experience of the dive cause that's the whole point for me is the dive. Making cool videos is my second priority on a dive, but that doesn't mean I don't want a good shot.
 

divingpyrate

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I go simple, gopro on a pole, secured in two places to bcd
Red filter, srp. Shoot only when there is something worth shooting. I personally prefer 2.7k 30fps, raw. If there is plenty of light 1080 60fps

The big thing to learn, dont shoot tge entire time
 

oleg96

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GoPro will take good pictures whenthere is a lot of light. Otherwise you will see a lot of blue or green.
I use Light and Motion Sola 2000 light makes a difference.

Here is one I have shot in Ocean City Maryland using light and one with out it. see the difference.
with light


this one i took before i bought light


Also depending on the water color where you at you might want to consider magenta filters.
 

SeahorseDeb

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So I'm new to Diving and GoPro and I would like to hear some tips for a newbie underwater user. I have a 3+ Black and a fair amount of mounts to include a frameless Octomask. One of my big concerns is being able to get good shots without hindering the experience of the dive cause that's the whole point for me is the dive. Making cool videos is my second priority on a dive, but that doesn't mean I don't want a good shot.

toddville393, Welcome! Before I put my GoPro in the water, I researched the heck out of it here in this forum. I watched loads of videos from posters, and subscribed to a few of their Vimeo and YouTube channels for my continuing education and still do! There are so many threads about equipment findings and what we like best, but you're on a great path here with us! The next thing I did was walk around my backyard with it and shoot video. Personally, I wanted to be sure I could handle the GoPro on dry land before I tasked myself underwater. The next thing I did was practice how close could I conceivably get with it before my subject became blurry (underwater the focal distance changes). I still lurk here nearly every day, reading and learning! Label your GoPro with your phone number, and make your first picture one of your contact info! Do secure it to your BC as you've already been advised. I have found myself wanting to let go of it for just a second and glad it's secured to me (hopefully they'll never have to bring up my body and have an argument about who gets the GoPro and leave me behind in the sand and all of my other equipment!) There are a lot of lost GoPros out there in the water, sadly. I'll let the other posters discuss what equipment to trick it out with.....they're very good at it!! Stay safe, and welcome to our addiction!!!
 
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FTD 83

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The big thing to learn, dont shoot tge entire time

I'd disagree with this, sorry. I found out the hard way (a pod of 5 dolphins swan past me about 10m away) that taking shots on and off consumes battery faster. After that I record the entire dive, usually switching on after descent and clearing my ears. I dive holding the camera at 90 degrees most of the time and then if there is anything I actually want to shoot, I turn the camera round properly. I mark the end of the shot by waving my hand across the lens, though not too close as this affects the auto focus, and put it back in the 90 degree position.

What I then have is 40 mins or so minutes of footage, most of it is rubbish with the seabed horizon running vertical, mask clearance etc but then it's easy with a video editor to pick out and segment the proper footage.

To completely contradict myself, I have now found myself turning off the record if there's particularly bad viz, bad light or just not much to see. Or if I've shot shot something pretty special in the last 20 mins and don't want to risk jeopardizing the footage. But even then I'll still record in 15-20 minute sections and usually record most of the dive.
 

lamarpaulski

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Diving pyrate gives good advice...its nice if you can view your videos soon after the dive to learn from mistakes. Work on being a good steady diver then a video guy. I love my 3+ ...btw...practice in a pool..get all the on off buttons memorized...use one button video setting for simplicity...play with it..review.results...learn...red filter is good advice too battery back pack helps..i use a morph video head lite with good results for dark places and nite diving...enjoy.
 

Z Gear

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I'd disagree with this, sorry. I found out the hard way (a pod of 5 dolphins swan past me about 10m away) that taking shots on and off consumes battery faster. After that I record the entire dive, usually switching on after descent and clearing my ears. I dive holding the camera at 90 degrees most of the time and then if there is anything I actually want to shoot, I turn the camera round properly. I mark the end of the shot by waving my hand across the lens, though not too close as this affects the auto focus, and put it back in the 90 degree position.

What I then have is 40 mins or so minutes of footage, most of it is rubbish with the seabed horizon running vertical, mask clearance etc but then it's easy with a video editor to pick out and segment the proper footage.

To completely contradict myself, I have now found myself turning off the record if there's particularly bad viz, bad light or just not much to see. Or if I've shot shot something pretty special in the last 20 mins and don't want to risk jeopardizing the footage. But even then I'll still record in 15-20 minute sections and usually record most of the dive.

I agree with this as well , regardless of what mount you use, its best to have the camera rolling so that you can video something that swims by unexpectedly. I had a huge shoal of mackerel swim right toward us and surround us, and then swim past, I would have mist this shot if I had not been recording most of my dive. You never know what is going to swim in your direction, and sometimes it happens to fast to set up your camera to take the shot!
 
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Pearlman

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I go simple, gopro on a pole, secured in two places to bcd
Red filter, srp. Shoot only when there is something worth shooting. I personally prefer 2.7k 30fps, raw. If there is plenty of light 1080 60fps

The big thing to learn, dont shoot tge entire time

I am a gopro newbie too, eager to learn some tips. 😆
Can you tell me what you use to secure the gopro to your bcd when using a gopole? And how do you extend the pole when it is secured to a bcd?
Thanks

Sent from MiPad
 
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Newbie to GoPro... Filters recommended? A retractable tether I would think will work nicely..
 

Hobby Mounts

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I guess if you're more interested in enjoying the dive than filming then any of the hands-free mounts would probably be best.

Chesty
Headstrap
Z-Gear BCD Mount

If you want to get more involved then you can look at Poles, Handgrips, Trays, etc.

Filters are good too if you don't feel confident playing around with Protune, WB and the technical settings.
 
https://www.shearwater.com/products/swift/

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