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Lionfish - are predators getting a taste for them

Discussion in 'Marine Life and Ecosystems' started by 60plus, Sep 12, 2019.

  1. 60plus

    60plus Barracuda

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Cumbria UK
    276
    110
    43
    Watched a couple of videos on youtube. One showed a Barracuda eating a lionfish, the other was the first recorded instance of grouper eating a lionfish.
    Lanzarote - I have never seen a lionfish and there are a lot of Barracuda
    Madeira - I have never seen a lionfish and there are quite a few barracuda and groupers
    Portugal - I did not see any groupers, maybe an occasional small barracuda but there were lionfish
    Greece - no barracuda or grouper but lionfish on 3 out of 6 dives.
     
  2. Graveyarddiver

    Graveyarddiver Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: North Carolina
    66
    33
    18
    In my opinion, no. They are growing in numbers in North Carolina, about the only thing slowing their population growth is fisherman chilling them whenever they catch one, and spear fisherman in dive boats killing every last one in a dive site. I’ve been seeing their. Umbers grow in the warmer south eastern United States waters, but not in New England the cold probably stops them from moving north
     
    Johnoly likes this.
  3. Doc

    Doc Was RoatanMan

    # of Dives: None - Not Certified
    Location: Chicago & O'Hare heading thru TSA 5x per year
    9,849
    2,572
    113
    Barracuda must be the solution to this man-made problem. Darwin in action, these wily predators will spread the word and evolve their DNA.

    Then we’ll be swimming, so to speak, in Barracudi. (Barracudem?)

    How ‘bout them Barracuda,
    Ain’t they shiny?
    Eatin’ them Lionfish,
    Bitin’ em in they hiney.
     
    Saboteur likes this.
  4. Steelyeyes

    Steelyeyes Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Redmond Wa
    521
    349
    63
    I did see a video clip of a white tipped reef shark eating one of it's own volition on a reef in Cuba. It's still seems to be very rare.
     
  5. Doc

    Doc Was RoatanMan

    # of Dives: None - Not Certified
    Location: Chicago & O'Hare heading thru TSA 5x per year
    9,849
    2,572
    113
    Rare Cuban reefs?
     
  6. Steelyeyes

    Steelyeyes Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Redmond Wa
    521
    349
    63
    Unassisted predation on lion fish is rare.
     
    Doc likes this.
  7. Pedro Burrito

    Pedro Burrito Moderator Staff Member

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: Boussens, Canton de Vaud, Suisse
    1,870
    976
    113


    A ScubaBoard Staff Message...


    Moved from Basic ​

     
  8. David Novo

    David Novo Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Porto, Portugal, Europe
    71
    16
    8
    Where?!
     
  9. 60plus

    60plus Barracuda

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Cumbria UK
    276
    110
    43
    In the bay off Lagos on the Algarve.
     
  10. 60plus

    60plus Barracuda

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Cumbria UK
    276
    110
    43
    They have also been see on the Mediterranean coast of Turkey
     

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