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Dream Dive Day All Goes Wrong (pt. Lobos)

Discussion in 'Near Misses & Lessons Learned' started by Dermochelys, Mar 17, 2016.

  1. Dermochelys

    Dermochelys Contributor

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Rocklin, CA
    173
    20
    I now have my own Suunto SK7
     
  2. Dermochelys

    Dermochelys Contributor

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Rocklin, CA
    173
    20
    On the buddy, yeah, I trusted in this guys "experience" and being a newbie at the time I took it for granted. One of my lessons learned. On the surface swim, I'm thankful it wasn't much worse than it was. I was diving in San Diego and a guy on the boat we were on (not my buddy though) surfaced way far away from the boat in the middle of a huge mat of kelp. It took the boat 30 minutes just to reach him and get him untangled. For the life of me I don't know why he surfaced there.

    So yeah, no kelp crawl for me on this day.

    Anyway, this happened several years ago, and I've become a better diver since then and taken what I learned this particular day to heart. Also, because this was awhile ago, perhaps the experience has become magnified in my mind a bit since I have had such excellent dives every other time I've gone diving. Have 2 bad dives so far seems like a pretty good hit rate for me.
     
    Seya likes this.
  3. BarbP

    BarbP Registered

    5
    0
    Stick to boat diving and go to CATALINA or the Channel Islands!!! That way you DRIVE to the dive boat and there WON'T be any surface swims or a dinghy dropping you off!!!
     
  4. cavedivingwoman

    cavedivingwoman Registered

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: San Francisco
    48
    22
    'Sorry you had a crappy experience but you're still in the game. Diving with an unknown buddy is always a shot in the dark. I've noticed that there is often an inverse correlation between a diver's bragging and his or her skills. Confident divers know their limits and don't need to thump their own chests. It sounds as if you had a bad buddy.
     
    rjack321 likes this.
  5. flyboy08

    flyboy08 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: NYC
    3,945
    2,808
    What's missing is...plan your dive and dive your plan? You seem to be familiar with the area so a pre dive briefing may have alleviated some of the confusion. Lastly, I agree with aborting the dive at the very first hint of a problem.....thanks for sharing, you'll be a better diver just for sharing your experience here.
     
  6. Zorab

    Zorab New

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: N. California, U.S.
    1
    0
    I ran into the same problem when I first started diving...it's really hard to trust another buddy after an event. What helped me the most was taking the Rescue Diver course. This class has allowed me to build my confidence in the water, especially when diving with people I really didn't know. I've learned to ask a lot of questions about the other person's dive history. I watch their awareness of their surroundings, gear assembly, buddy checks, interactions with me & others, & even their over health or mental focus. If I'm observant, I can see many red flags in these areas before we descend. Some divers can get a little complacent over time and sometimes take small things for granted. Also a lot can change once you hit the water. There are people who will always be mavericks and those who only focus on their own agenda. But I'm okay with all that because I've know my limits, I trust my own decision making & stay within my zone. Now, I have no problems communicating to my buddy that I'm ending the dive and resurfacing to dive another day. I feel prepared now and don't feel compelled to make what I believe are risky decisions. We all dive for our own reasons but for me safety plus fun equals a great dive!!!

    I hope this is helpful information and that you continue on your dive journey!!
     
  7. 3D diver

    3D diver Contributor

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Los Altos, CA
    1,685
    360
    Yikes! Didn't see this post 'til today. Bummer way to see Lobos.
     
  8. sea_otter

    sea_otter Contributor

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: San Jose, CA
    323
    245
    I have only been diving in Monterey for a short time, but what I've learned is that it can be unforgiving and that conservative plans are a good thing. When you add cold water, low visibility, and managing a dry suit, my limits of what I'm willing to dive go way down. It is a very different experience from jumping off a boat in the tropics to do a 100' wall dive with a random buddy who hasn't been in the water for a year (something which I've done often).

    There's plenty to see at the beginner sites. Middle Reef is a great one and a short swim. It's easy to hype up a site and want to see it all your first time there, but you're probably end up having more fun taking it slow.
     
  9. sea_otter

    sea_otter Contributor

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: San Jose, CA
    323
    245
    Oops I just realized that I replied to a very old thread! It sounds like your recent experience at Point Lobos was a much better one. :)
     
  10. 3D diver

    3D diver Contributor

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Los Altos, CA
    1,685
    360

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